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Divorce and Remarriage in Rural Malawi

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  • FFF1Georges NNN1Reniers

    (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine)

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    Abstract

    The demographic study of nuptiality in African countries is not very developed and often of secondary interest in a discussion of the proximate determinants of fertility. This paper uses unusual marriage history data to examine divorce and remarriage in rural Malawi. Life table probabilities of divorce range from 40 to 65 percent and are among the highest on the continent. An investigation into the determinants of marital instability using proportional hazards models confirms the importance of kinship systems and female empowerment, but the mechanism underlying the high divorce rates in Malawi seems to be more complicated than that. This is, for example, illustrated in the effect of the polygyny variables. Marriage, divorce, and remarriage are further considered as empowering strategies that women deploy throughout their lives.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research Special Collections.

    Volume (Year): 1 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 6 (September)
    Pages: 175-206

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:drspec:v:1:y:2003:i:6

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: Africa; divorce; Malawi; marriage;

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    References

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    1. Teresa Martin & Larry Bumpass, 1989. "Recent trends in marital disruption," Demography, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 37-51, February.
    2. Alderman, Harold & Watkins, Susan Cotts & Kohler, Hans-Peter & Maluccio, John A. & Behrman, Jere R., 2000. "Attrition in longitudinal household survey data," FCND briefs 96, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Marie-Paule Thiriat & Thérèse Locoh, 1995. "Divorce et remariage des femmes en Afrique de l'Ouest. Le cas du Togo," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 50(1), pages 61-93.
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    Cited by:
    1. Michelle Poulin & Adamson S. Muula, 2011. "An inquiry into the uneven distribution of women’s HIV infection in rural Malawi," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(28), pages 869-902, December.
    2. Aureo de Paula & Gil Shapira & Petra E. Todd, 2009. "How Beliefs about HIV Status Affect Risky Behaviors: Evidence from Malawi, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 10-004, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 27 Jan 2010.
    3. Greenwood, Jeremy & Kircher, Philipp & Santos, Cezar & Tertilt, Michèle, 2013. "An Equilibrium Model of the African HIV/AIDS Epidemic," CEPR Discussion Papers 9423, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Telalagic, S., 2012. "Domestic Production as a Source of Marital Power: Theory and Evidence from Malawi," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1243, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    5. Monica Grant & Sara Yeatman, 2014. "The Impact of Family Transitions on Child Fostering in Rural Malawi," Demography, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 205-228, February.
    6. Aureo de Paula & Gil Shapira & Petra Todd, 2008. "How Beliefs about HIV Status Affect Risky Behaviors: Evidence from Malawi," PIER Working Paper Archive 08-035, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    7. Shelley Clark & Dana Hamplová, 2013. "Single Motherhood and Child Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Life Course Perspective," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(5), pages 1521-1549, October.
    8. Georges Reniers & Rania Tfaily, 2008. "Polygyny and HIV in Malawi," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(53), pages 1811-1830, October.
    9. Kirsten P. Smith & Susan Cotts Watkins, 2005. "Perceptions of Risk and Strategies for Prevention: Responses to HIV/AIDS in Rural Malawi," PGDA Working Papers 0305, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    10. Emla Fitzsimons & Bansi Malde & Alice Mesnard & Marcos Vera-Hernandez, 2014. "Nutrition, information, and household behaviour: experimental evidence from Malawi," IFS Working Papers W14/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    11. Sara Yeatman & Christie Sennott & Steven Culpepper, 2013. "Young Women’s Dynamic Family Size Preferences in the Context of Transitioning Fertility," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(5), pages 1715-1737, October.
    12. Anglewicz, Philip & Clark, Shelley, 2013. "The effect of marriage and HIV risks on condom use acceptability in rural Malawi," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 29-40.
    13. McCarthy, Nancy & Kilic, Talip, 2014. "The nexus between gender, collective action for public goods, and agriculture : evidence from Malawi," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6806, The World Bank.

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