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Adolescent childbearing in sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Neeru Gupta

    (World Health Organization)

  • Mary Mahy

    (UNICEF)

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    Abstract

    This article examines whether increased years of schooling exercised a consistent impact on delayed childbearing in sub-Saharan Africa. Data were drawn from Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in eight countries over the period 1987-1999. Multiple logistic regressions were used to assess trends and determinants in the probability of first birth during adolescence. Girls' education from about the secondary level onwards was found to be the only consistently significant covariate. No effect of community aggregate education was discernible, after controlling for urbanity and other individual-level variables. The results reinforce previous findings that improving girls' education is a key instrument for raising ages at first birth, but suggest that increases in schooling at lower levels alone bear only somewhat on the prospects for fertility decline among adolescents.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol8/4/8-4.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 8 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 4 (February)
    Pages: 93-106

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:8:y:2003:i:4

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: adolescence; Africa; developing countries; education; fertility; fertility determinants;

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    1. Øystein Kravdal, 2000. "A search for aggregate-level effects of education on fertility, using data from Zimbabwe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(3), August.
    2. Øystein Kravdal, 2002. "Education and fertility in sub-Saharan africa: Individual and community effects," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 233-250, May.
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