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Children's experience of family disruption and family formation: Evidence from 16 FFS countries

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  • Gunnar Andersson

    (Stockholm University)

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    Abstract

    In this paper, we present a number of descriptive measures on children’s experience of family disruption and family formation. We use data from the Fertility and Family Surveys of 15 European countries and corresponding data from the USA in order to find out what kind of family circumstances children are born into and what experience they subsequently have of various family-transformation events of their mothers. Our presentation reveals some similarities but also striking differences in the family-demographic experience of children in different countries. The USA stands out as one extreme case with its very high proportion of children born to a lone mother, with a higher probability of children who experience a union disruption of their parents than anywhere else, and with many children having the experience of living in a stepfamily. Italy stands out at the other end of the scale. Practically all children here are born to a married mother and very few of them experience the dissolution of their parents’ union before they turn 15.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 7 (August)
    Pages: 343-364

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:7:y:2002:i:7

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: children; Europe; family dynamics; USA;

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    1. Larry Bumpass & R. Raley, 1995. "Redefining single-parent families: Cohabitation and changing family reality," Demography, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 97-109, February.
    2. Gunnar Andersson & Dimiter Philipov, 2002. "Life-table representations of family dynamics in Sweden, Hungary, and 14 other FFS countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(4), pages 67-144, August.
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    Cited by:
    1. Maureen A. Pirog & Kathleen M. Ziol-Guest, 2006. "Child support enforcement: Programs and policies, impacts and questions," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(4), pages 943-990.
    2. Meyer, Daniel R. & Skinner, Christine & Davidson, Jacqueline, 2011. "Complex families and equality in child support obligations: A comparative policy analysis," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1804-1812, October.
    3. Kathleen Kiernan, 2005. "Non-residential fatherhood and child involvement: evidence from the millennium cohort study," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6257, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. FFF1Gerda NNN1Neyer & FFF2Gunnar NNN2Andersson, 2004. "Contemporary Research on European Fertility: Introduction," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(1), pages 1-14, April.
    5. Timo Hener & Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2013. "Political Socialization in Flux?: Linking Family Non-Intactness during Childhood to Adult Civic Engagement," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 612, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. Elizabeth Thomson & Maria Winkler-Dworak & Martin Spielauer & Alexia Prskawetz, 2012. "Union Instability as an Engine of Fertility? A Microsimulation Model for France," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 175-195, February.
    7. Blau, David M. & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2007. "A Demographic Analysis of the Family Structure Experiences of Children in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 3001, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. repec:cep:sticas:100 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Björklund, Anders & Ginther, Donna K. & Sundström, Marianne, 2004. "Family Structure and Child Outcomes in the United States and Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 1259, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Elizabeth Thomson & Helen Eriksson, 2013. "Register-based estimates of parents' coresidence in Sweden, 1969-2007," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(42), pages 1153-1186, December.
    11. Laura Cavalli & Alessandro Bucciol & Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Nicola Sartor & Alessandro Sommacal, 2012. "Modelling life-course decisions for the analysis of interpersonal and intrapersonal redistribution," Working Papers 25/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    12. Gunnar Andersson, 2003. "Dissolution of unions in Europe: a comparative overview," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-004, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

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