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Life-table representations of family dynamics in Sweden, Hungary, and 14 other FFS countries

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  • Gunnar Andersson

    (Stockholm University)

  • Dimiter Philipov

    (Vienna Institute of Demography, Austrian Academy of Sciences)

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    Abstract

    In this study, we present a system of descriptions of family-demographic behavior in developed countries. We use life-table techniques in order to describe the experience of men, of women, and of children in processes related to family formation and family dissolution. We develop a large number of descriptive measures, and apply them to survey data from Sweden, Norway, Finland, France, the USA, Austria, Germany (East and West Germany separately), Flanders, Italy, Spain, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Poland, in order to describe patterns in the family-demographic behavior during the late 1980s - early 1990s. We use Sweden and Hungary as examples when presenting the outline of our system of tabulations and provide results for the whole set of countries in an Appendix to the paper.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol7/4/7-4.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 4 (August)
    Pages: 67-144

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:7:y:2002:i:4

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: description; family dynamics; life tables;

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    References

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    1. Gunnar Andersson & Dimiter Philipov, 2001. "Life-table representations of family dynamics in 16 FFS countries," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-024, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Gunnar Andersson, 2001. "Children’s experience of family disruption and family formation: evidence from 16 FFS countries," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-028, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. FFF1Gerda NNN1Neyer & FFF2Gunnar NNN2Andersson, 2004. "Contemporary Research on European Fertility: Introduction," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(1), pages 1-14, April.
    2. Monika Mynarska & Anna Matysiak, 2010. "Diffusion of cohabitation in Poland," Working Papers 19, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    3. Gunnar Andersson, 2003. "Dissolution of unions in Europe: a comparative overview," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-004, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Anna Matysiak, 2009. "Is Poland really 'immune' to the spread of cohabitation?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-012, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Brienna Perelli-Harris & Wendy Sigle-Rushton & Michaela Kreyenfeld & Trude Lappegård & Caroline Berghammer & Renske Keizer, 2010. "The educational gradient of nonmarital childbearing in Europe: emergence of a pattern of disadvantage?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2010-004, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Tomas Sobotka & Laurent Toulemon, 2008. "Overview Chapter 4: Changing family and partnership behaviour," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(6), pages 85-138, July.
    7. Brienna Perelli-Harris & Michaela Kreyenfeld & Wendy Sigle-Rushton & Renske Keizer & Trude Lappegård & Aiva Jasilioniene & Caroline Berghammer & Paola Di Giulio & Katja Köppen, 2009. "The increase in fertility in cohabitation across Europe: examining the intersection between union status and childbearing," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    8. Gunnar Andersson, 2002. "Children's experience of family disruption and family formation: Evidence from 16 FFS countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(7), pages 343-364, August.
    9. Dimiter Philipov & Aiva Jasilioniene, 2008. "Union formation and fertility in Bulgaria and Russia: A life table description of recent trends," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(62), pages 2057-2114, December.

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