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A comparative analysis of leaving home in the United States, the Netherlands and West Germany

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Author Info

  • Clara Mulder

    (University of Groningen, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, Population Research Centre)

  • William A.V. Clark

    (University of California, Los Angeles)

  • Michael Wagner

    (University of Cologne)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    We investigate how leaving the parental home differs between three countries with different welfare-state and housing systems: the USA, the Netherlands and West Germany. Using longitudinal survey data, we examine the transitions of leaving home to live with and without a partner. We find that, much more than in the European countries, union formation has become separated from leaving home in the USA. We also find a different impact of level of education and employment status on leaving-home patterns in the European countries with their social-welfare state system than in the US system in which market forces prevail. The differences are not just related to welfare-state systems but also to the sizes of the countries and the geographical dispersion of jobs and educational opportunities.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol7/17/7-17.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 17 (December)
    Pages: 565-592

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:7:y:2002:i:17

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: Germany; household; leaving the parental home; Netherlands; union formation; USA;

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    References

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    1. Francesco C. Billari & Dimiter Philipov & Pau Baizán Munoz, 2001. "Leaving home in Europe: the experience of cohorts born around 1960," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-014, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Leslie Whittington & H. Elizabeth Peters, 1996. "Economic incentives for financial and residential independence," Demography, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 82-97, February.
    3. Ermisch, John, 1999. "Prices, Parents, and Young People's Household Formation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 47-71, January.
    4. Mike Murphy & Duolao Wang, 1998. "Family and sociodemographic influences on patterns of leaving home in Postwar Britain," Demography, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 293-305, August.
    5. Donald R. Haurin & Patric H. Hendershott & Susan M. Wachter, 1996. "Expected Home Ownership and Real Wealth Accumulation of Youth," NBER Working Papers 5629, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:
    1. Clara Mulder, 2013. "Family dynamics and housing," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(14), pages 355-378, September.

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