Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

A search for aggregate-level effects of education on fertility, using data from Zimbabwe

Contents:

Author Info

  • Øystein Kravdal

    (University of Oslo)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The analysis was based on the 1994 ZDHS combined with aggregate data from the 1992 census. Discrete-time hazard models for first and higher-order births were estimated for 1990-94. The average length of education in the district and the proportion who are literate were found to have no impact on a woman’s birth rate above and beyond that of her own education, when it was controlled for urbanization. This was the case for women who themselves had little or no education as well as for the better-educated. So far, no significant influence of aggregate education on fertility has been well documented in the literature either. However, in this study, aggregate-level effects appeared in models for fertility desires and contraceptive use among married women with at least one child.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol3/3/3-3.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol3/3/html/default.htm
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 3 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 3 (August)
    Pages:

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:3:y:2000:i:3

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: aggregate; education; fertility; models; multilevel;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Thomas, D, 1996. "Fertility, Education and Resources in South Africa," Papers 96-15, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Alfred O. Agwanda & Philippe Bocquier & Anne Khasakhala & Samuel Owuor, 2004. "The effect of economic crisis on youth precariousness in Nairobi. An analysis of itinerary to adulthood of three generations of men and women," Working Papers DT/2004/04, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    2. Kofi D. Benefo, 2006. "The community-level effects of women's education on reproductive behaviour in rural Ghana," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(20), pages 485-508, June.
    3. Cecilia Albert & María A. Davia, 2004. "Salud, salarios y educación," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 169(2), pages 11-34, June.
    4. Neeru Gupta & Mary Mahy, 2003. "Adolescent childbearing in sub-Saharan Africa," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 8(4), pages 93-106, February.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:3:y:2000:i:3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Editorial Office).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.