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The effect of education on second births in Hungary

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Author Info

  • Tamás Bartus

    (Institute of Sociology and Social Policy, Corvinus University, Budapest)

  • Lívia Murinkó

    (Demographic Research Institute, Budapest)

  • Ivett Szalma

    (Corvinus University, Budapest)

  • Bernadett Szél

    (Corvinus University, Budapest)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The effect of education on the transition to second births is examined using three waves of the Hungarian GGS data. We hypothesize that higher education increases the hazard of second conception and this effect is due to the presence of highly educated partner. Parity-specific survival models are estimated using women born between 1946 and 1983. Higher education decreases the time to second conception. The partner’s education reduces the waiting time to second conception. The results remain robust after controlling for sample selection. The findings support the partner effect hypothesis (Kreyenfeld 2002).

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol28/1/28-1.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 1-32

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:28:y:2013:i:1

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: education; fertility; Hungary; partner effect; second births;

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    1. David Roodman, 2011. "Fitting fully observed recursive mixed-process models with cmp," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 11(2), pages 159-206, June.
    2. V. Joseph Hotz & Robert A. Miller, . "An Empirical Analysis of Life Cycle Fertility and Female Labor Supply," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 86-15, Chicago - Population Research Center.
    3. Sunnee Billingsley, 2011. "Economic crisis and recovery: Changes in second birth rates within occupational classes and educational groups," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 24(16), pages 375-406, March.
    4. Stephan Klasen & Andrey Launov, 2006. "Analysis of the determinants of fertility decline in the Czech Republic," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 25-54, February.
    5. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S279-88, Part II, .
    6. Larry E. Jones & Alice Schoonbroodt & Michèle Tertilt, 2010. "Fertility Theories: Can They Explain the Negative Fertility-Income Relationship?," NBER Chapters, in: Demography and the Economy, pages 43-100 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Martin Klesment & Allan Puur, 2010. "Effects of education on second births before and after societal transition: Evidence from the Estonian GGS," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(28), pages 891-932, May.
    8. Cornelia Muresan & Jan M. Hoem, 2010. "The negative educational gradients in Romanian fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(4), pages 95-114, January.
    9. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, October.
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