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Economic resources and the first child in Italy: A focus on income and job stability

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  • Elisabetta Santarelli

    (Independent researcher)

Abstract

At the turn of the twentieth century Italy registered a lowest-low fertility level, i.e., a total fertility rate of 1.26 children per woman in 2000. In this paper we investigate whether and how in that period economic resources and, in particular, income and job stability were linked with couples’ decisions to enter parenthood. With this aim, we use data from ECHP and carry out a longitudinal analysis on a sample of childless married couples to study the transition to their first child. Results show that the couples’ employment arrangement played some role in first child rates, with the single earner arrangement experiencing the highest first birth rates. We also find that employed women with labour income have much lower first birth rates than non-working women, while no evidence is found for male earnings and other sources of income. As concerns job instability, we find evidence that it was not significantly linked with the transition to first time parenthood during the investigated period.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 25 (2011)
Issue (Month): 9 (July)
Pages: 311-336

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:25:y:2011:i:9

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: event history analysis; income; job stability; transition to first child;

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References

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  1. Pau Baizán Munoz & Arnstein Aassve & Francesco C. Billari, 2001. "Cohabitation, marriage, first birth: the interrelationship of family formation events in Spain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-036, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  2. Daniela Del Boca & Silvia Pasqua & Chiara Pronzato, 2005. "Fertility and Employment in Italy, France, and the UK," LABOUR, CEIS, CEIS, vol. 19(s1), pages 51-77, December.
  3. Del Boca, Daniela, 2002. "The Effect of Child Care and Part Time Opportunities on Participation and Fertility Decisions in Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 427, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2004. "Fertility decisions in the FRG and GDR," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  5. FFF1Michaela NNN1Kreyenfeld, 2004. "Fertility Decisions in the FRG and GDR: An Analysis with Data from the German Fertility and Family Survey," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(11), pages 275-318, April.
  6. Bratti, Massimiliano, 2002. "Labour Force Participation and Marital Fertility of Italian Women: The Role of Education," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002, Royal Economic Society 34, Royal Economic Society.
  7. Elisabetta Santarelli & Francesco Cottone, 2009. "Leaving home, family support and intergenerational ties in Italy: Some regional differences," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(1), pages 1-22, July.
  8. George B. Roberts, Chairman, Universities-National Bureau Committee for Economic Research, 1960. "Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number univ60-2, July.
  9. Esping-Andersen Gosta (ed.), 2007. "Family Formation and Family Dilemmas in Contemporary Europe," Books, Fundacion BBVA / BBVA Foundation, Fundacion BBVA / BBVA Foundation, number 201178.
  10. Gerda R. Neyer, 2006. "Family policies and fertility in Europe: fertility policies at the intersection of gender policies, employment policies and care policies," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  11. repec:ese:iserwp:2006-06 is not listed on IDEAS
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Cited by:
  1. Marika Jalovaara & Anneli Miettinen, 2013. "Does his paycheck also matter?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(31), pages 881-916, April.
  2. Daniele Vignoli & Sven Drefahl & Gustavo De Santis, 2012. "Whose job instability affects the likelihood of becoming a parent in Italy? A tale of two partners," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(2), pages 41-62, January.
  3. Tom Kornstad & Marit Rønsen, 2014. "Women’s wages and fertility revisited. Evidence from Norway," Discussion Papers, Research Department of Statistics Norway 784, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  4. Karin E. Lundström & Gunnar Andersson, 2012. "Labor-market status, migrant status and first childbearing in Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(25), pages 719-742, December.

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