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The changing determinants of UK young adults´ living arrangements

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  • Juliet Stone

    (University of Southampton)

  • Ann Berrington

    (University of Southampton)

  • Jane Falkingham

    (University of Southampton)

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    Abstract

    The postponement of partnership formation and parenthood in the context of an early average age at leaving home has resulted in increased heterogeneity in the living arrangements of young adults in the UK. More young adults now remain in the parental home, or live independently of the parental home but outside of a family. The extent to which these trends are explained by the increased immigration of foreign-born young adults, the expansion in higher education, and the increased economic insecurity faced by young adults are examined. Shared non-family living is particularly prominent among those with experience of higher education, whilst labour market uncertainty is associated with an extended period of co-residence with parents.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol25/20/25-20.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 25 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 20 (September)
    Pages: 629-666

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:25:y:2011:i:20

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: higher education; labour market; NEET; non-family living; parental home; transition; young adulthood;

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    References

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    1. William Barnes & Geoff Bright & Colin Hewat, 2008. "Making sense of Labour Force Survey response rates," Economic and Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 2(10), pages 32-42, December.
    2. Debra Leaker, 2009. "Unemployment Trends since the 1970s," Economic and Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 3(2), pages 37-41, February.
    3. Francesco C. Billari & Dimiter Philipov & Pau Baizán Munoz, 2001. "Leaving home in Europe: the experience of cohorts born around 1960," MPIDR Working Papers, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany WP-2001-014, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Joan Chandler & Malcolm Williams & Moira Maconachie & Tracey Collett & Brian Dodgeon, 2004. "Living Alone: Its Place in Household Formation and Change," Sociological Research Online, Sociological Research Online, Sociological Research Online, vol. 9(3), pages chandler.
    5. Dylan Kneale & Heather Joshi, 2008. "Postponement and childlessness - Evidence from two British cohorts," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(58), pages 1935-1968, November.
    6. Shelley Budgeon, 2006. "Friendship and Formations of Sociality in Late Modernity: the Challenge of 'Post Traditional Intimacy'," Sociological Research Online, Sociological Research Online, Sociological Research Online, vol. 11(3), pages budgeon.
    7. Catherine Barham & Annette Walling & Gareth Clancy & Stephen Hicks & Sarah Conn, 2009. "Young people and the labour market," Economic and Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 3(4), pages 17-29, April.
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