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Who fears and who welcomes population decline?

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  • Hendrik P. Van Dalen

    (Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute)

  • Kène Henkens

    (Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute)

Abstract

European countries are experiencing population decline and the tacit assumption in most analyses is that the decline may have detrimental welfare effects. In this paper we use a survey among the population in the Netherlands to discover whether population decline is always met with fear. A number of results stand out: population size preferences differ by geographic proximity: at a global level the majority of respondents favors a (global) population decline, but closer to home one supports a stationary population. Population decline is clearly not always met with fear: 31 percent would like the population to decline at the national level and they generally perceive decline to be accompanied by immaterial welfare gains (improvement environment) as well as material welfare losses (tax increases, economic stagnation). In addition to these driving forces it appears that the attitude towards immigrants is a very strong determinant at all geographical levels: immigrants seem to be a stronger fear factor than population decline.

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol25/13/25-13.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 25 (2011)
Issue (Month): 13 (August)
Pages: 437-464

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:25:y:2011:i:13

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: decline; externalities; immigration; population; population policy; preferences;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Julie Fry, 2014. "Migration and Macroeconomic Performance in New Zealand: Theory and Evidence," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/10, New Zealand Treasury.

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