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Things change: Women’s and men’s marital disruption dynamics in Italy during a time of social transformations, 1970-2003

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Author Info

  • Silvana Salvini

    (University of Florence)

  • Daniele Vignoli

    (University of Florence)

Abstract

We study women’s and men’s marital disruption in Italy between 1970 and 2003. By applying an event-history analysis to the 2003 Italian variant of the Generations and Gender Survey we found that the spread of marital disruption started among middle-highly educated women. Then in recent years it appears that less educated women have also been able to dissolve their unhappy unions. Overall we can see the beginning of a reversed educational gradient from positive to negative. In contrast the trend in men’s marital disruption risk appears as a change over time common to all educational groups, although with persisting educational differentials.

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol24/5/24-5.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 24 (2011)
Issue (Month): 5 (February)
Pages: 145-174

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:24:y:2011:i:5

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: determinants; educational differences; event history analysis; gender difference; Italy; marital disruption;

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Cited by:
  1. De Paola, Maria & Gioia, Francesca, 2013. "Does Patience Matter for Marriage Stability? Some Evidence from Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 7769, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Anna Matysiak & Marta Styrc & Daniele Vignoli, 2011. "The changing educational gradient in marital disruption: A meta-analysis of European longitudinal research," Working Papers, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics 45, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  3. Letizia Mencarini & Daniele Vignoli, 2014. "Women’s employment makes unions more stable, if the male partners contribute to the unpaid household work," Econometrics Working Papers Archive, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti" 2014_06, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".

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