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Consumption-Driven Environmental Impact and Age Structure Change in OECD Countries

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  • Brantley Liddle

    (Victoria University)

Abstract

This paper examines two environmental impacts for which population has a substantial demonstrated influence: transport carbon emissions and residential electricity consumption. It takes as its starting point the STIRPAT framework and disaggregates population into four key age groups: 20-34, 35-49, 50-69, and 70 and older. Population age structure’s influence was significant and varied across cohorts, and its profile was different for two dependent variables. For transport, young adults (20-34) were intensive, whereas the other cohorts had negative coefficients. For residential electricity consumption, age structure had a U-shaped impact: the youngest and oldest had positive coefficients, while the middle cohorts had negative coefficients.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 24 (2011)
Issue (Month): 30 (May)
Pages: 749-770

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:24:y:2011:i:30

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: demography; environment; FMOLS panel cointegration; GHG emissions projections; IPAT; STIRPAT;

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Cited by:
  1. WenShwo Fang & Stephen M. Miller & Chih-Chuan Yeh, 2012. "The effect of ECSOs on energy use," Working papers 2012-13, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  2. Liddle, Brantley, 2013. "Urban Density and Climate Change: A STIRPAT Analysis using City-level Data," MPRA Paper 52089, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Georgina Mace & Emma Terama & Tim Coulson, 2013. "Perspectives on International Trends and Dynamics in Population and Consumption," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(4), pages 555-568, August.
  4. Liddle, Brantley, 2013. "Population, Affluence, and Environmental Impact Across Development: Evidence from Panel Cointegration Modeling," MPRA Paper 52088, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Sarah Harper, 2013. "Population–Environment Interactions: European Migration, Population Composition and Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(4), pages 525-541, August.
  6. Menz, Tobias & Welsch, Heinz, 2012. "Population aging and carbon emissions in OECD countries: Accounting for life-cycle and cohort effects," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 842-849.
  7. Rentziou, Aikaterini & Gkritza, Konstantina & Souleyrette, Reginald R., 2012. "VMT, energy consumption, and GHG emissions forecasting for passenger transportation," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 487-500.

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