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Circular migration patterns and determinants in Nairobi slum settlements

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Author Info

  • Donatien Beguy

    (African Population and Health Research Center, Nairobi)

  • Philippe Bocquier

    (Université catholique de Louvain)

  • Eliya Msiyaphazi Zulu

    (African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP))

Abstract

This paper measures migration flows and determinants in two slum settlements in Nairobi City between 2003 and 2007. The results confirm the high intensity of migration with a quarter of the total slum population and a third of those aged 15-30 being renewed annually. A circular migration system is at play whereby the majority of slum dwellers are short-term migrants spending on average less than 3 years in the area. Migration is more intense during early adulthood (20-24), and despite very similar determinants across gender, mobility is more intense among women compared to men. The increasing feminization of migration is likely to change the face of slum settlements, resulting in more balanced sex ratios, in line with city-wide trends in Nairobi over the past half century. The high population turnover is due to the insecurity of livelihoods, tenure, and poor basic amenities and social services in slum settlements.

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol23/20/23-20.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 23 (2010)
Issue (Month): 20 (September)
Pages: 549-586

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:23:y:2010:i:20

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: Africa; demographic surveillance system; event history analysis; internal migration; Nairobi; slum settlements; urban integration;

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Cited by:
  1. Arnold, Christine & Theede, Jason & Gagnon, Anita, 2014. "A qualitative exploration of access to urban migrant healthcare in Nairobi, Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 1-9.
  2. Camlin, Carol S. & Kwena, Zachary A. & Dworkin, Shari L. & Cohen, Craig R. & Bukusi, Elizabeth A., 2014. "“She mixes her business”: HIV transmission and acquisition risks among female migrants in western Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 146-156.
  3. Archambault, Caroline S. & de Laat, Joost & Zulu, Eliya Msiyaphazi, 2012. "Urban Services and Child Migration to the Slums of Nairobi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1854-1869.
  4. Amelie Constant & Klaus Zimmermann, 2011. "Circular and Repeat Migration: Counts of Exits and Years Away from the Host Country," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 495-515, August.
  5. FAYE Ousmane & ISLAM Nizamul & ZULU Eliya, 2011. "Poverty dynamics in Nairobi's slums: testing for true state dependence and heterogeneity effects," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2011-56, CEPS/INSTEAD.

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