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Age, relationship status, and the planning status of births

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Author Info

  • Sarah R. Hayford

    (Arizona State University)

  • Karen Benjamin Guzzo

    (Bowling Green State University)

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    Abstract

    In the United States historically, births to older mothers have been more likely to be planned than births to younger mothers, and births to unmarried women have been less likely to be planned than births to married women. As the average age of mothers has increased and more births have occurred outside of marriage in the United States, the intersection of these trends may have weakened the traditional linkage between age and birth planning status. In this article, we examine differences by maternal age in planning status of births using The 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. We find that age is strongly associated with planning status, but the association is reduced in magnitude when controlling for relationship status and is stronger for first and second births than for higher-parity births. Further, the association between union status and the planning status of births varies by race-ethnicity.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol23/13/23-13.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 23 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 13 (August)
    Pages: 365-398

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:23:y:2010:i:13

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: cohabitation; fertility intentions; fertility plans; fertility timing; marriage; nonmarital fertility;

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    1. Lawrence Wu & Kelly Musick, 2008. "Stability of Marital and Cohabiting Unions Following a First Birth," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, Springer, vol. 27(6), pages 713-727, December.
    2. Kelly Musick, 2007. "Cohabitation, nonmarital childbearing, and the marriage process," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(9), pages 249-286, April.
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    Cited by:
    1. Mikko Myrskylä & Rachel Margolis, 2014. "Happiness - before and after the Kids," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) 642, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Kurowska, Anna & Myck, Michal & Wrohlich, Katharina, 2012. "Family and Labor Market Choices: Requirements to Guide Effective Evidence-Based Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 6846, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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