Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Estimation of multi-state life table functions and their variability from complex survey data using the SPACE Program

Contents:

Author Info

  • Liming Cai

    (National Center for Health Statistics)

  • Mark Hayward

    (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Yasuhiko Saito

    (Nihon University)

  • James Lubitz

    (National Center for Health Statistics)

  • Aaron Hagedorn

    (University of Southern California)

  • Eileen Crimmins

    (University of Southern California)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The multistate life table (MSLT) model is an important demographic method to document life cycle processes. In this study, we present the SPACE (Stochastic Population Analysis for Complex Events) program to estimate MSLT functions and their sampling variability. It has several advantages over other programs, including the use of microsimulation and the bootstrap method to estimate the sampling variability. Simulation enables researchers to analyze a broader array of statistics than the deterministic approach, and may be especially advantageous in investigating distributions of MSLT functions. The bootstrap method takes sample design into account to correct the potential bias in variance estimates.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol22/6/22-6.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 6 (January)
    Pages: 129-158

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:22:y:2010:i:6

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: bootstrap; health expectancy; multi-state life table; population aging;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Liming Cai & Nathaniel Schenker & James Lubitz, 2006. "Analysis of functional status transitions by using a semi-Markov process model in the presence of left-censored spells," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 55(4), pages 477-491.
    2. Agnes Lievre & Nicolas Brouard & Christopher Heathcote, 2003. "The Estimation Of Health Expectancies From Cross-Longitudinal Surveys," Mathematical Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 211-248.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Dustin Brown & Mark Hayward & Jennifer Montez & Robert Hummer & Chi-Tsun Chiu & Mira Hidajat, 2012. "The Significance of Education for Mortality Compression in the United States," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(3), pages 819-840, August.
    2. Jennifer Van Hook & Claire Altman, 2013. "Using Discrete-Time Event History Fertility Models to Simulate Total Fertility Rates and Other Fertility Measures," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 585-610, August.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:22:y:2010:i:6. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Editorial Office).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.