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Marriage choices and social reproduction

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Author Info

  • Martin Dribe

    (University of Lund)

  • Christer Lundh

    (University of Gothenburg)

Abstract

This article studies the relationship between partner selection and socioeconomic status (SES) attainment and mobility in five rural parishes in southern Sweden, 1815-1894. Three different aspects of partner selection are considered: age, social origin, and geographical origin. We use an individual-level database containing information on the SES origin (parental land holding and occupation), age difference, and place of birth of the married couple. The results show a powerful association between partner selection and SES attainment and mobility. Social heterogamy was particularly important, but age heterogamy and geographic exogamy was also clearly related to both SES attainment and mobility.

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol22/14/22-14.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 22 (2010)
Issue (Month): 14 (March)
Pages: 347-382

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:22:y:2010:i:14

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: age homogamy; geographic endogamy; intergenerational social mobility; partner selection; social homogamy; socioeconomic attainment;

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  1. Herscovici, Steven, 1998. "Migration and Economic Mobility: Wealth Accumulation and Occupational Change Among Antebellum Migrants and Persisters," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(04), pages 927-956, December.
  2. Long, Jason, 2005. "Rural-Urban Migration and Socioeconomic Mobility in Victorian Britain," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(01), pages 1-35, March.
  3. Tommy Bengtsson & Martin Dribe, 2006. "Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: Southern Sweden, 1766–1864," Demography, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 727-746, November.
  4. Stewart, James I., 2006. "Migration to the agricultural frontier and wealth accumulation, 1860-1870," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 547-577, October.
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Cited by:
  1. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Gupta, Sumedha, 2011. "The role of marriage in the causal pathway from economic conditions early in life to mortality," Working Paper Series 2011:23, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  2. Martin Dribe & Jan Van Bavel & Cameron Campbell, 2012. "Social Mobility and Demographic Behaviour: Long Term Perspectives," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(8), pages 173-190, March.

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