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The effects of shocks in early life mortality on later life expectancy and mortality compression: A cohort analysis

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  • Mikko Myrskylä

    (London School of Economics and Political Science)

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    Abstract

    I study how shocks in cohort-level early life conditions, as represented by deviations from trend in mortality before age 5, affect later mortality. I use data for six European countries and find that shocks that increase infant mortality decrease later life expectancy between ages 5-30. The effect is strong for England and Wales but small or insignificant for other countries. Shocks that increase mortality at ages 1-5 increase life expectancy between ages 5-30 and compress the mortality distribution. For both shocks the effects are weak at older ages. These results suggest that early life conditions have a transitory effect and potentially only little influence on old-age mortality.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol22/12/22-12.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 12 (March)
    Pages: 289-320

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:22:y:2010:i:12

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: cohort effects; early life conditions; mortality;

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