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Assortative matching among same-sex and different-sex couples in the United States, 1990-2000

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Author Info

  • Christine Schwartz

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

  • Nikki Graf

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

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    Abstract

    Same-sex couples are less likely to be homogamous than different-sex couples on a variety of characteristics, including race/ethnicity, age, and education. This study confirms results from previous studies using 1990 U.S. census data and extends previous analyses to examine changes from 1990 to 2000. We find that same-sex male couples are generally the least likely to resemble one another, followed by same-sex female couples, different-sex cohabitors, and different-sex married couples. Despite estimated growth in the numbers of same-sex couples in the population and the increasing acceptance of non-traditional unions, we find little evidence of diminishing differences in the resemblance of same- and different-sex couples between 1990 and 2000, with the possible exception of educational homogamy.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol21/28/21-28.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 28 (December)
    Pages: 843-878

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:21:y:2009:i:28

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: assortative mating; interracial unions; same-sex couples;

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Black, Dan & Gates, Gary & Sanders, Seth & Taylor, Lowell, 2002. "Why Do Gay Men Live in San Francisco?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 54-76, January.
    2. Lisa Jepsen & Christopher Jepsen, 2002. "An empirical analysis of the matching patterns of same-sex and opposite-sex couples," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 435-453, August.
    3. Dan Black & Gary Gates & Seth Sanders & Lowell Taylor, 2000. "Demographics of the gay and lesbian population in the United States: Evidence from available systematic data sources," Demography, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 139-154, May.
    4. Christopher Carpenter & Gary Gates, 2008. "Gay and lesbian partnership: Evidence from California," Demography, Springer, vol. 45(3), pages 573-590, August.
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    Cited by:
    1. Kenneth Aarskaug Wiik & Ane Seierstad & Turid Noack, 2012. "Divorce in norwegian same-sex marriages 1993-2011," Discussion Papers 723, Research Department of Statistics Norway.

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