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Leaving the parental home in post-war Japan

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  • Setsuya Fukuda

    (National Institute of Population and Social Security Research)

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    Abstract

    Leaving home is a key life event in the transition to adulthood, but it has been relatively less explored in demographic studies of contemporary Japan. This paper examines the relationship between home-leaving intensities of young adults and the rapid social, economic, and demographic changes that took place in post-World War II Japan. By using event-history analysis, the study focuses on 1) family and socio-demographic characteristics, 2) stem-family norms, and 3) proximities of life events and leaving home as the main factors affecting the chances of leaving home. This study aims to explain cohort trends and sex differentials in home-leaving behaviors among young adults in post-war Japan.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol20/30/20-30.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 30 (June)
    Pages: 731-816

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:20:y:2009:i:30

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: event history analysis; Japan; leaving home; life course; living arrangements; nest-leaving; stem-family system; transition to adulthood; young adults;

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    References

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    1. Tineke Fokkema & Aart C. Liefbroer, 2008. "Trends in living arrangements in Europe: Convergence or divergence?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(36), pages 1351-1418, July.
    2. Donald R. Haurin & R. Jean Haurin & Steven Garasky, 2001. "Group living decisions as youths transition to adulthood," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 329-349.
    3. Genda, Yuji & Kurosawa, Masako, 2001. "Transition from School to Work in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 465-488, December.
    4. Francesco C. Billari & Dimiter Philipov & Pau Baizán Munoz, 2001. "Leaving home in Europe: the experience of cohorts born around 1960," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-014, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. David G. Blanchflower & Richard B. Freeman, 2000. "Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number blan00-1, May.
    6. Leslie Whittington & H. Elizabeth Peters, 1996. "Economic incentives for financial and residential independence," Demography, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 82-97, February.
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