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The age separating early deaths from late deaths

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Author Info

  • Zhen Zhang

    (Fudan University)

  • James W. Vaupel

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research)

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    Abstract

    There is a unique threshold age separating early deaths from late deaths such that averting an early death decreases life disparity, but averting a late death increases inequality in lifespans.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol20/29/20-29.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 29 (June)
    Pages: 721-730

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:20:y:2009:i:29

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: life disparity; mortality;

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Siu Cheung & Jean-Marie Robine & Edward Tu & Graziella Caselli, 2005. "Three dimensions of the survival curve: horizontalization, verticalization, and longevity extension," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 243-258, May.
    2. John Wilmoth & Shiro Horiuchi, 1999. "Rectangularization revisited: Variability of age at death within human populations," Demography, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 475-495, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Tomasz Wrycza, 2014. "Variance in age at death equals average squared remaining life expectancy at death," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(50), pages 1405-1412, May.
    2. Michal Engelman & Hal Caswell & Emily Agree, 2014. "Why do lifespan variability trends for the young and old diverge? A perturbation analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(48), pages 1367-1396, May.
    3. Tomasz Wrycza, 2014. "Entropy of the Gompertz-Makeham mortality model," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(49), pages 1397-1404, May.
    4. Alyson A. van Raalte & Pekka Martikainen & Mikko Myrskylä, 2012. "Lifespan variation by occupational class: compression or stagnation over time?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2012-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Tomasz Wrycza & Annette Baudisch, 2012. "How life expectancy varies with perturbations in age-specific mortality," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(13), pages 365-376, September.

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