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Poverty and living arrangements among youth in Spain, 1980-2005

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  • Sara Ayllón

    (Universitat de Girona)

Abstract

One of the most relevant demographic events in Spain from a recent historical perspective was the baby boom of the 1960s and 1970s. The "adapting to circumstances" of these generations of youth and their families through delayed emancipation and childbearing has been key in preventing a decline in their economic status. The results show that the reduction of the poverty risk among non-emancipated youth for the period 1980-2005 is explained by the fact that an increasing number of young Spaniards live with both employed parents. Thus, emancipation delay is found most in those families that can best afford it. Furthermore, the salaries of young workers remaining in the parental home have become an important factor in reducing their family poverty risk. On the other hand, fertility decline is readily explained by the economic difficulties young couples encounter in sustaining their offspring.

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol20/17/20-17.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 20 (2009)
Issue (Month): 17 (April)
Pages: 403-434

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:20:y:2009:i:17

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: Heckman selection probit; living arrangements; youth poverty;

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  1. Maite Martínez-Granado & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2002. "The decisions of Spanish youth: A cross-section study," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 305-330.
  2. R. Alessie & Agar Brugiavini & Guglielmo Weber, 2004. "Saving and cohabition: the economic consequences of living with ones parents in Italy and the Netherlands," Working Papers 04-22, Utrecht School of Economics.
  3. Olga Cantó & Coral del Río & Carlos Gradín, . "La Evolución De La Pobreza Estática Y Dinámica En España En El Periodo 1985.1995," Working Papers 24-02 Classification-JEL , Instituto de Estudios Fiscales.
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  6. Arnstein Aassve & Maria Iacovou & Letizia Mencarini, 2006. "Youth poverty and transition to adulthood in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(2), pages 21-50, July.
  7. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-66, May.
  8. Pedro Mira & Namkee Ahn, 2001. "Job bust, baby bust?: Evidence from Spain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 505-521.
  9. Arnstein Aassve & Francesco C . Billari & Fausta Ongaro, 2001. "The Impact of Income and Employment Status on Leaving Home: Evidence from the Italian ECHP Sample," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 15(3), pages 501-529, 09.
  10. Lavinia Parisi, 2008. "Leaving Home and the Chances of Being Poor: The Case of Young People in Southern European Countries," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(s1), pages 89-114, 06.
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