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Children’s school participation and HIV/AIDS in rural Malawi:

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  • Monica J. Grant

    (University of Wisconsin)

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    Abstract

    Studies of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and children’s educational attainment largely focus on the direct impacts of parental illness and death, overlooking the potential indirect impact that parental knowledge and perceptions of their HIV status may have on children’s school enrollment. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative evidence from Malawi, this paper finds that women’s real and perceived anticipation of future health shocks has a positive impact on their children’s educational attainment. Interventions that target health uncertainty, such as HIV testing programs, may make a significant contribution to maintaining children’s educational attainment in communities affected by HIV/AIDS.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol19/45/19-45.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 19 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 45 (September)
    Pages: 1603-1634

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:19:y:2008:i:45

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: Africa; AIDS/HIV; education; health uncertainty; HIV testing; orphans; risk perception;

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