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Poland: Fertility decline as a response to profound societal and labour market changes?

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Author Info

  • Irena E. Kotowska

    (Warsaw School of Economics)

  • Janina Jóźwiak

    (Warsaw School of Economics)

  • Anna Matysiak

    (Vienna Institute of Demography, Austrian Academy of Sciences)

  • Anna Baranowska

    (Warsaw School of Economics)

Abstract

This article opens with a review of the main trends in family-related behaviour, i.e. fertility decline and changes in fertility patterns, a decreasing propensity to marry, postponement of marriage, and a slowly increasing frequency of divorces and separations. The analysis takes into account urban and rural differences. We then aim to identify the main determinants of family changes within the general conceptual framework of the Second Democratic Transition (SDT) in Poland. However, contrary to mainstream interpretations of the SDT, the main emphasis of this study is on the structural components of change, which need to be reformulated to account for processes specific to the transition to a market economy. The focus is, therefore, on labour market developments and family policy, and to a lesser extent on ideational change.

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol19/22/19-22.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 19 (2008)
Issue (Month): 22 (July)
Pages: 795-854

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:19:y:2008:i:22

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: childbearing; Europe; fertility; fertility decline; Poland;

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References

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  1. Monika Mynarska & Laura Bernardi, 2007. "Meanings and attitudes attached to cohabitation in Poland," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(17), pages 519-554, June.
  2. Alícia Adserà, 2004. "Changing fertility rates in developed countries. The impact of labor market institutions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 17-43, February.
  3. World Bank, 2004. "Gender and Economic Opportunities in Poland : Has Transition Left Women Behind?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14850, The World Bank.
  4. Hans-Peter Kohler & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "Tempo-Adjusted Period Parity Progression Measures, Fertility Postponement and Completed Cohort Fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 6(6), pages 91-144, March.
  5. Puhani, Patrick A., 1995. "Labour supply of married women in Poland: a microeconometric study based on the Polish labour force survey," ZEW Discussion Papers 95-12, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Anna Matysiak, 2009. "Is Poland really 'immune' to the spread of cohabitation?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-012, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  2. Małgorzata Podogrodzka, 2012. "Determinanty przestrzennego zróżnicowania płodności w Polsce w latach 1999-2009," Collegium of Economic Analysis Annals, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis, issue 28, pages 145-164.
  3. Tomas Sobotka, 2008. "Overview Chapter 6: The diverse faces of the Second Demographic Transition in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(8), pages 171-224, July.
  4. Anna Matysiak & Daniele Vignoli, 2009. "Finding the "right moment" for the first baby to come: a comparison between Italy and Poland," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-011, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  5. Anna Baranowska & Anna Matysiak, 2011. "Does parenthood increase happiness? Evidence for Poland," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 9(1), pages 307-325.
  6. Tomas Frejka, 2008. "Overview Chapter 5: Determinants of family formation and childbearing during the societal transition in Central and Eastern Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(7), pages 139-170, July.
  7. Monika Mynarska, 2011. "Kiedy mieæ dziecko? Jakoœciowe badanie procesu odraczania decyzji o rodzicielstwie," Working Papers 32, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  8. Anna Matysiak & Daniele Vignoli, 2011. "Different women’s employment and fertility behaviours in similar institutional settings: Evidence from Italy and Poland," Working Papers 41, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  9. Anna Matysiak, 2012. "Fertility developments in Central and Eastern Europe: the role of work-family tensions," Working Papers 49, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  10. Joanna Z. Mishtal, 2009. "Understanding low fertility in Poland," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(20), pages 599-626, October.
  11. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak & Monika Mynarska, 2012. "Does Lone Motherhood Decrease Women’s Subjective Well-Being? Evidence from Qualitative and Quantitative Research," Working Papers 48, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  12. Anna Baranowska, 2011. "Premarital conceptions and their resolution. The decomposition of trends in rural and urban areas in Poland 1985-2009," Working Papers 27, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  13. Pawe³ Strzelecki, 2010. "Projekcja liczby pracuj¹cych w rolnictwie indywidulanym w Polsce w latach 2008-2035," Working Papers 31, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  14. Monika Mynarska & Anna Matysiak, 2010. "Women's determination to combine childbearing and paid employment: How can a qualitative approach help us understand quantitative evidence?," Working Papers 26, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.

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