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Residential mobility and migration of the separated

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  • Feijten Peteke

    (Netherlands Institute for Social Research)

  • Maarten van Ham

    (Delft University of Technology)

Abstract

Separation is known to have a disruptive effect on the housing careers of those involved, mainly because a decrease in resources causes (temporary) downward moves on the housing ladder. Little is known about the geographies of the residential mobility behaviour of the separated. Applying a hazard analysis to retrospective life-course data for the Netherlands, we investigate three hypotheses: individuals who experienced separation move more often than do steady singles and people in intact couple relationships, they are less likely to move over long distances, and they move more often to cities than people in intact couple relationships. The results show that separation leads to an increase in mobility, to moves over short distance for men with children, and to a prevalence of the city as a destination of moves.

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol17/21/17-21.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 17 (2007)
Issue (Month): 21 (December)
Pages: 623-654

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:17:y:2007:i:21

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

Related research

Keywords: divorce; family dynamics; gender; hazard analysis; internal migration; longitudinal analysis; Netherlands; retrospective data; separation; spatial mobility;

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References

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  1. Arnstein Aassve & Gianni Betti & Stefano Mazzuco & Letizia Mencarini, 2007. "Marital disruption and economic well-being: a comparative analysis," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 170(3), pages 781-799.
  2. Sarah Jarvis & Stephen P. Jenkins, 1997. "Marital Splits and Income Changes: Evidence for Britain," Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series iopeps97/26, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
  3. Boheim, Rene & Taylor, Mark P., 2000. "My Home Was My Castle: Evictions and Repossessions in Britain," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 287-319, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Hill Kulu & Nadja Milewski, 2007. "Family change and migration in the life course," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(19), pages 567-590, December.
  2. Kronenberg, Kristin & Carree, Martin, 2010. "Job and residential mobility in the Netherlands: the influence of human capital, household composition and location," MPRA Paper 25840, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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