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The anthropological demography of Europe

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  • Laura Bernardi

    (University of Lausanne)

  • Inge Hutter

    (Population Research Centre, University of Groningen)

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    Abstract

    This paper introduces a collection of related research studies on the anthropological demography of Europe. Anthropological demography is a specialty within demography that uses anthropological theory and methods to provide a better understanding of demographic phenomena in current and past populations. Its genesis and ongoing growth lies at the intersection of demography and socio-cultural anthropology and with their efforts to understand population processes: mainly fertility, migration, and mortality. Both disciplines share a common research subject, namely human populations, and they focus on mutually complementary aspects. The authors of this paper focus on the differences between the disciplines of anthropology and demography, the emergence of anthropological demography and its theoretical, methodological, and empirical aspects. In addition, they critically summarize the contributions that were presented in the first workshop of the Working Group on Anthropological Demography of Europe of the European Association for Population Studies, held in Rostock in Fall 2005 and reflect on how these papers add to the further development of anthropological demography in Europe, i.e. elaborating the epistemology of anthropological demography; applying additional theoretical perspectives to better understand demographic behaviour in Europe ; illustrating the way in which culture plays a role in case studies on European demographic behaviour; and emphasizing the need for a holistic approach to data collection and the added value of triangulating quantitative and qualitative analyses.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 17 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 18 (December)
    Pages: 541-566

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:17:y:2007:i:18

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: culture; ethnography; fertility; fieldwork; gender; institutional demography; meanings; migration; mixed methods; political economy; qualitative methods;

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Patrick Heady, 2007. "What can anthropological methods contribute to demography - and how?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(18), pages 555-558, June.
    2. North, Douglass C, 1994. "Economic Performance through Time," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 359-68, June.
    3. Denzau, Arthur T & North, Douglass C, 1994. "Shared Mental Models: Ideologies and Institutions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 3-31.
    4. Monika A. Mynarska & Laura Bernardi, 2007. "Meanings and attitudes attached to cohabitation in Poland: qualitative analyses of the slow diffusion of cohabitation among the young generation," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2007-006, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Monika Mynarska & Laura Bernardi, 2007. "Meanings and attitudes attached to cohabitation in Poland," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(17), pages 519-554, June.
    6. Jennifer Johnson-Hanks, 2007. "What kind of theory for anthropological demography?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(1), pages 1-26, January.
    7. Ernestina Coast & Katherine Hampshire & Sara Randall, 2007. "Disciplining anthropological demography," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(16), pages 493-518, June.
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    Cited by:
    1. Monika Mynarska, 2011. "Kiedy mieæ dziecko? Jakoœciowe badanie procesu odraczania decyzji o rodzicielstwie," Working Papers 32, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    2. Anna Matysiak & Monika Mynarska, 2013. "Women’s self-employment in Poland: A strategy for combining work and childcare?," Working Papers 68, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    3. Monika Mynarska & Anna Matysiak, 2010. "Women's determination to combine childbearing and paid employment: How can a qualitative approach help us understand quantitative evidence?," Working Papers 26, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    4. Christine Bachrach, 2014. "Culture and Demography: From Reluctant Bedfellows to Committed Partners," Demography, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 3-25, February.

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