Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Effects Of Differences In Risk Aversion On The Distribution Of Wealth

Contents:

Author Info

  • COEN-PIRANI, DANIELE

Abstract

This paper studies the role played by differences in risk aversion in affecting the long-run distribution of wealth across agents in the context of an endowment economy. The economy is populated by two types of Epstein-Zin agents who differ only in their attitudes toward risk. By choosing riskier portfolio strategies, less-risk-averse agents enjoy returns on their investments characterized by a higher mean and a higher variance than the ones enjoyed by more-risk-averse agents. The former effect tends to make less-risk-averse agents wealthier over time, whereas the latter tends to make them poorer. The paper shows that, contrary to the results obtained using standard expected utility preferences, for some parameter values the long-run distribution of wealth is dominated by more-risk-averse agents.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1365100504040052
File Function: link to article abstract page
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Macroeconomic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 8 (2004)
Issue (Month): 05 (November)
Pages: 617-632

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:8:y:2004:i:05:p:617-632_04

Contact details of provider:
Postal: The Edinburgh Building, Shaftesbury Road, Cambridge CB2 2RU UK
Fax: +44 (0)1223 325150
Web page: http://journals.cambridge.org/jid_MDYProvider-Email:journals@cambridge.org

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Marco Cozzi, 2012. "Risk Aversion Heterogeneity, Risky Jobs and Wealth Inequality," Working Papers 1286, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  2. Daniele Coen-Pirani, 2000. "Margin Requirements and Equilibrium Asset Prices," GSIA Working Papers 2001-E5, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  3. Matthias Doepke & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2013. "Culture, Entrepreneurship, and Growth," NBER Working Papers 19141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Roche, Hervé, 2011. "Asset prices in an exchange economy when agents have heterogeneous homothetic recursive preferences and no risk free bond is available," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 80-96, January.
  5. Alonso, Irasema & Prado, Jr., Jose Mauricio, 2007. "Ambiguity Aversion, the Equity Premium and the Welfare Costs of Business Cycles," Seminar Papers 752, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  6. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "The Stationary Distribution of Wealth under Progressive Taxation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(3), pages 469-478, July.
  7. Gianluca Femminis, 2012. "Risk aversion heterogeneity and the investment-uncertainty relationship," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Teoria Economica e Metodi Quantitativi itemq1260, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:8:y:2004:i:05:p:617-632_04. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Keith Waters).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.