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Human Capital Accumulation And The Transition From Specialization To Multitasking

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  • BOUCEKKINE, RAOUF
  • CRIFO, PATRICIA

Abstract

Cet article fournit des fondements théoriques à l'augmentation simultanée de la polyvalence, le capital humain et l'usage de l'informatique dans de nombreux pays de l'OCDE dans les années 1990. les liens entre organisation du travail, technologie et capital humain sont modélisés en établissant les conditions sous lesquelles les firmes allouent le temps de travail des travailleurs entre plusieurs tâches productives. Le changment organisationnel est ensuite analysé dans une perspective dynamique comme la transition de la spécialsiation à la polyvalence en mettant l'accent sur ses déterminants technologiques et éducatifs.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Macroeconomic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 12 (2008)
Issue (Month): 03 (June)
Pages: 320-344

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Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:12:y:2008:i:03:p:320-344_07

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References

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  1. Caroli, Eve & Van Reenen, John, 1999. "Skill biased organizational change? Evidence from a panel of British and French establishments," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 9917, CEPREMAP.
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  8. Daron Acemoglu, 1999. "Changes in Unemployment and Wage Inequality: An Alternative Theory and Some Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1259-1278, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Raouf Boucekkine & Patricia Crifo & Claudio Mattalia, 2008. "Technological Progress, Organizational Change and the Size of the Human Resources Department," Working Papers hal-00240715, HAL.
  2. Eichhorst, Werner & Kendzia, Michael J. & Schneider, Hilmar & Buhlmann, Florian, 2013. "Report No. 51: Neue Anforderungen durch den Wandel der Arbeitswelt," IZA Research Reports 51, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. DeVaro, Jed & Farnham, Martin, 2011. "Two perspectives on multiskilling and product-market volatility," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 862-871.
  4. Hiller, Victor, 2011. "Work organization, preferences dynamics and the industrialization process," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1007-1025.
  5. Raouf Boucekkine & Natali Hritonenko & Yuri Yatsenko, 2013. "Health, Work Intensity, and Technological Innovations," AMSE Working Papers 1320, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised Mar 2013.

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