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Opening and Closing the Market: Evidence from the London Stock Exchange

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Author Info

  • Ellul, Andrew
  • Shin, Hyun Song
  • Tonks, Ian

Abstract

Various markets, particularly NASDAQ, have been under pressure from regulators and market participants to introduce call auctions for their opening and closing periods. We investigate the performance of call markets at the open and close from a unique natural experiment provided by the institutional structure of the London Stock Exchange. As well as a call auction, there is a parallel ¶off-exchange¶ dealership system at both the market's open and close. Although the call market dominates the dealership system in terms of price discovery, we find that the call suffers from a high failure rate to open and close trading, especially on days characterized by difficult trading conditions. In particular, the call's trading costs increase significantly when (a) asymmetric information is high, (b) trading is expected to be slow, (c) order flow is unbalanced, and (d) uncertainty is high. Furthermore, traders' resort to call auctions is negatively correlated with firm size, implying that the call auction is not the optimal method for opening and closing trading of medium and small sized stocks. We suggest that these results can be explained by thick market externalities.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis.

Volume (Year): 40 (2005)
Issue (Month): 04 (December)
Pages: 779-801

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jfinqa:v:40:y:2005:i:04:p:779-801_00

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Cited by:
  1. Chelley-Steeley, Patricia L., 2008. "Market quality changes in the London Stock Market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 2248-2253, October.
  2. Chakrabarty, Bidisha & Corwin, Shane A. & Panayides, Marios A., 2011. "When a halt is not a halt: An analysis of off-NYSE trading during NYSE market closures," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 361-386, July.
  3. Menkveld, Albert J., 2006. "Splitting orders in overlapping markets: a study of cross-listed stocks," Serie Research Memoranda 0003, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  4. Angelidis, Timotheos & Andrikopoulos, Andreas, 2010. "Idiosyncratic risk, returns and liquidity in the London Stock Exchange: A spillover approach," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 214-221, June.
  5. Carole Comerton-Forde & James Rydge & Hayley Burridge, 2007. "Not all call auctions are created equal: evidence from Hong Kong," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 395-413, November.
  6. Susan Thomas, 2010. "Call Auctions: A Solution to Some Difficulties in Indian Finance," Working Papers id:2597, eSocialSciences.
  7. Chang, Rosita P. & Rhee, S. Ghon & Stone, Gregory R. & Tang, Ning, 2008. "How does the call market method affect price efficiency? Evidence from the Singapore Stock Market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 2205-2219, October.
  8. Pagano, Michael S. & Peng, Lin & Schwartz, Robert A., 2013. "A call auction's impact on price formation and order routing: Evidence from the NASDAQ stock market," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 331-361.
  9. Kandel, Eugene & Rindi, Barbara & Bosetti, Luisella, 2012. "The effect of a closing call auction on market quality and trading strategies," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 23-49.
  10. Pagano, Michael S. & Peng, Lin & Schwartz, Robert A., 2008. "The quality of price formation at market openings and closings: Evidence from the Nasdaq stock market," CFS Working Paper Series 2008/45, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  11. Chen, Tao & Cai, Jun & Ho, Richard Y.K., 2009. "Intraday information efficiency on the Chinese equity market," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 527-541, September.

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