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The Ties that Divide: A Network Analysis of the International Monetary System, 1890 1910

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  • FLANDREAU, MARC
  • JOBST, CLEMENS

Abstract

Conventional studies of the late-nineteenth-century international monetary system refer heuristically to core and peripheral countries. In this article, we seek to provide rigorous foundations to such expressions. Applying a formal procedure borrowed from network analysis produces indices of centrality and systematic rankings. We show that the international monetary system of the late nineteenth century is best described as a three-tier system. Other findings include the discovery of a closely knitted European foreign exchange system, a complete lack of foreign exchange linkages within Latin America, emerging intra-Asian relations, and a fairly late ascendancy of the U.S. dollar.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

Volume (Year): 65 (2005)
Issue (Month): 04 (December)
Pages: 977-1007

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:65:y:2005:i:04:p:977-1007_00

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  1. Ricardo, David, 1821. "On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, edition 3, number ricardo1821.
  2. Flandreau, Marc & Sussman, Nathan, 2004. "Old Sins: Exchange Rate Clauses and European Foreign Lending in the 19th Century," CEPR Discussion Papers 4248, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Michael P. Dooley & David Folkerts-Landau & Peter Garber, 2003. "An Essay on the Revived Bretton Woods System," NBER Working Papers 9971, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Luis Catão & Solomos Solomou, 2003. "Exchange Rates in the Periphery and International Adjustment Under the Gold Standard," IMF Working Papers 03/41, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Flandreau, Marc, 2004. "The Glitter of Gold: France, Bimetallism, and the Emergence of the International Gold Standard, 1848-1873," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199257867, September.
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Cited by:
  1. Drelichman, Mauricio & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2008. "Lending to the Borrower from Hell: Debt and Default in the Age of Phillip II," Economics working papers mauricio_drelichman-2008-, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 06 Sep 2010.
  2. Drelichman, Mauricio & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2009. "Lending to the Borrower from Hell: Debt and Default in the Age of Philip II, 1556-1598," CEPR Discussion Papers 7276, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Anna Larsson Seim & Anders Akerman, 2012. "The Global Arms Trade Network 1950-2007," DEGIT Conference Papers c017_055, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  4. Marc Flandreau & Stefano Ugolini, 2011. "Where It All Began: Lending of Last Resort and the Bank of England During the Overend, Gurney Panic of 1866," Working Papers 0007, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  5. Benjamin Cohen, 2012. "The Benefits and Costs of an International Currency: Getting the Calculus Right," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 13-31, February.

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