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Rural-Urban Migration and Socioeconomic Mobility in Victorian Britain

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  • LONG, JASON
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    Abstract

    This article analyzes rural-urban migration in Great Britain in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Using a new dataset of 28,000 individuals matched between the 1851 and 1881 population censuses, I examine the selection process and treatment effect of migration, controlling for the endogeneity of the migration decision. I find that urban migrants were positively selected the best of the rural labor pool and that the economic benefits of migration were substantial. Migrants responded to market signals, and labor markets were largely efficient; however, not all gains from migration were exploited, potentially indicating some degree of inefficiency.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

    Volume (Year): 65 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 01 (March)
    Pages: 1-35

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    Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:65:y:2005:i:01:p:1-35_05

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    Cited by:
    1. Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay & Elliott Green, 2010. "The Reversal of Fortune Thesis Reconsidered," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE 016, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    2. Martin Dribe & Jan Van Bavel & Cameron Campbell, 2012. "Social Mobility and Demographic Behaviour: Long Term Perspectives," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(8), pages 173-190, March.
    3. Martin Dribe & Christer Lundh, 2010. "Marriage choices and social reproduction," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(14), pages 347-382, March.
    4. Jörg Baten & Dorothee Crayen, 2008. "Global Trends in Numeracy 1820-1949 and its Implications for Long-Run Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 2218, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. A'Hearn, Brian & Baten, Jörg & Crayen, Dorothee, 2009. "Quantifying Quantitative Literacy: Age Heaping and the History of Human Capital," CEPR Discussion Papers 7277, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Jane Humphries & Tim Leunig, 2007. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind?: anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London," Economic History Working Papers, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History 22317, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    7. Braggion, F., 2008. "Managers, Firms and (Secret) Social Networks: The Economics of Freemasonry," Discussion Paper, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research 2008-36, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    8. Stewart, James I., 2012. "Migration to U.S. frontier cities and job opportunity, 1860–1880," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 528-542.
    9. Abramitzky, Ran & Boustan, Leah Platt & Eriksson, Katherine, 2013. "Have the poor always been less likely to migrate? Evidence from inheritance practices during the age of mass migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 2-14.
    10. Dalton, John & Leung, Tin Cheuk, 2013. "Dispersion and Distortions in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade," MPRA Paper 48224, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    1. Historical Economic Geography

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