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Diets Versus Diseases: The Anthropometrics of Slave Children

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  • COELHO, PHILIP R. P.
  • MCGUIRE, ROBERT A.

Abstract

What were the living standards of American slaves? According to Robert W. Fogel and Stanley Engerman in their monumental study, Time on the Cross, the material standard of living of slaves compared favorably with that of other nineteenth-century agricultural laborers. More recently, utilizing anthropometric data that allow them to construct age-height profiles for slaves, economic historians have cast doubts upon this view as it applies to particular age cohorts. They question the validity of the earlier assessment of living standards as it applies to slave newborns, infants, and children.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

Volume (Year): 60 (2000)
Issue (Month): 01 (March)
Pages: 232-246

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:60:y:2000:i:01:p:232-246_00

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Cited by:
  1. Scott A. Carson, 2008. "Nineteenth Century Black and White US Statures: The Primary Sources of Vitamin D and their Relationship with Height," CESifo Working Paper Series 2497, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Scott Carson, 2009. "African-American and white inequality in the nineteenth century American South: a biological comparison," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 739-755, July.
  3. Carson, Scott Alan, 2011. "Height of female Americans in the 19th century and the antebellum puzzle," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 157-164, March.
  4. Richard Steckel, 2005. "Fluctuations in a Dreadful Childhood: Synthetic longitudinal height data, relative prices, and weather in the short-term health of american slaves," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _058, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  5. Aksan, Anna-Maria & Chakraborty, Shankha, 2013. "Twin Transitions," MPRA Paper 49929, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Eric B. Schneider, 2014. "Children's Growth in an Adaptive Framework: Explaining the Growth Patterns of American Slaves and Other Historical Populations," Economics Series Working Papers Number 130, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  7. Scott A. Carson, 2008. "Geography, Insolation, and Institutional Change in 19th Century African-American andWhite Stature in Southern States," CESifo Working Paper Series 2434, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. Richard H. Steckel, 2008. "Heights and Human Welfare: Recent Developments and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 14536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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