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The Importance of Slavery and the Slave Trade to Industrializing Britain

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  • ELTIS, DAVID
  • ENGERMAN, STANLEY L.
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    Abstract

    John Stuart Mill s comment that the British Caribbean was really a part of the British domestic economy, because almost all its trade was with British buyers and sellers, is used to make a new assessment of the importance of the eighteenth-century slave systems to British industrialization. If the value added and strategic linkages of the sugar industry are compared to those of other British industries, it is apparent that sugar cultivation and the slave trade were not particularly large, nor did they have stronger growth-inducing ties with the rest of the British economy.

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    File URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S002205070000005X
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

    Volume (Year): 60 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 01 (March)
    Pages: 123-144

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    Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:60:y:2000:i:01:p:123-144_00

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    Cited by:
    1. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/687 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Dalton, John T. & Leung, Tin Cheuk, 2011. "Why is Polygyny More Prevalent in Western Africa?: An African Slave Trade Perspective," MPRA Paper 32598, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Chenny, Shirley & St-Amour, Pascal & Vencatachellum, Desire, 2003. "Slave prices from succession and bankruptcy sales in Mauritius, 1825-1827," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 419-442, October.
    4. Bezemer, Dirk & Bolt, Jutta & Lensink, Robert, 2014. "Slavery, Statehood, and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 148-163.
    5. Guillaume Daudin, 2006. "Profits du commerce international et croissance de la France au XVIIIe siècle," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/684, Sciences Po.
    6. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Slavery and Imperialism Did Not Enrich Europe," MPRA Paper 20696, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Peter H. Lindert & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2001. "Does Globalization Make the World More Unequal?," NBER Working Papers 8228, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Meissner, Christopher M., 2014. "Growth from Globalization? A View from the Very Long Run," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 8, pages 1033-1069 Elsevier.
    9. Guillaume Daudin, 2004. "Profitability of slave and long distance trading in context : the case of eightheenth century France," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/687, Sciences Po.
    10. Dalton, John & Leung, Tin Cheuk, 2013. "Dispersion and Distortions in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade," MPRA Paper 48224, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/684 is not listed on IDEAS

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