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Sticks and Stones: Naming and Shaming the Human Rights Enforcement Problem

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  • Hafner-Burton, Emilie M.
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal International Organization.

    Volume (Year): 62 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 04 (October)
    Pages: 689-716

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    Handle: RePEc:cup:intorg:v:62:y:2008:i:04:p:689-716_08

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    Cited by:
    1. Cullen Hendrix & Wendy Wong, 2014. "Knowing your audience: How the structure of international relations and organizational choices affect amnesty international’s advocacy," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 29-58, March.
    2. Cabus, Sofie J. & De Witte, Kristof, 2012. "Naming and shaming in a ‘fair’ way. On disentangling the influence of policy in observed outcomes," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 767-787.
    3. Dreher, Axel & Gassebner, Martin & Siemers, Lars-H. R., 2010. "Globalization, economic freedom and human rights," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 115, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Eric Neumayer, 2013. "Do governments mean business when they derogate? Human rights violations during notified states of emergency," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 1-31, March.
    5. Susan Ariel Aaronson & M. Rodwan Abouharb, 2010. "Unexpected Bedfellows: The GATT, the WTO, and Some Democratic Rights," Working Papers 2010-12, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    6. Ruggeri Andrea & Burgoon Brian, 2012. "Human Rights “Naming & Shaming” and Civil War Violence," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(3), pages 1-13, December.
    7. Varun Gauri, 2011. "The cost of complying with human rights treaties: The convention on the rights of the child and basic immunization," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 33-56, March.
    8. Axel Dreher & Martin Gassebner & Lars-H. R. Siemers, 2012. "Globalization, Economic Freedom, and Human Rights," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 56(3), pages 516-546, June.
    9. Amanda Murdie & Dursun Peksen, 2013. "The impact of human rights INGO activities on economic sanctions," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 33-53, March.
    10. Kristian Skrede Gleditsch & Simon Hug & Livia Isabella Schubiger & Julian Wucherpfennig, 2011. "International Conventions and Non-State Actors: Selection, Signaling, and Reputation Effects," HiCN Working Papers 108, Households in Conflict Network.
    11. Gauri, Varun & Gloppen, Siri, 2012. "Human rights based approaches to developmen t: concepts, evidence, and policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5938, The World Bank.
    12. Sarah Stroup & Amanda Murdie, 2012. "There’s no place like home: Explaining international NGO advocacy," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 425-448, December.
    13. Eric Neumayer, 2013. "Do governments mean business when they derogate?: human rights violations during notified states of emergency," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 43856, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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