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Resistance economics: social cost and the evolution of antibiotic resistance

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  • Brown, Gardner
  • Layton, David F.
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Environment and Development Economics.

    Volume (Year): 1 (1996)
    Issue (Month): 03 (July)
    Pages: 349-355

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    Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:1:y:1996:i:03:p:349-355_00

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    Cited by:
    1. Gardner Brown, 2000. "Renewable Natural Resource Management and Use Without Markets," Working Papers 0025, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    2. Gardner Brown & Ramanan Laxminarayan, 1998. "Economics of Antibiotic Resistance," Working Papers 0060, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    3. GAUDET, Gérard & HERRMANN, Markus, 2007. "The Economic Dynamics of Antibiotic Efficacy under Open Access," Cahiers de recherche 2007-04, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    4. Francesca Barigozzi & Bertrand Villeneuve, 2006. "The Signaling Effect of Tax Policy," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 8(4), pages 611-630, October.
    5. Laxminarayan, Ramanan & Brown, Gardner M., 2001. "Economics of Antibiotic Resistance: A Theory of Optimal Use," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 183-206, September.
    6. Rudholm, Niklas, 2002. "Economic implications of antibiotic resistance in a global economy," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 1071-1083, November.
    7. Gardner M. Brown, 2000. "Renewable Natural Resource Management and Use without Markets," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(4), pages 875-914, December.
    8. David H. Howard, 2004. "Resistance-induced antibiotic substitution," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(6), pages 585-595.
    9. F. Barigozzi & B. Villeneuve, 2001. "Influencing the Misinformed Misbehaver: An Analysis of Public Policy towards Uncertainty and External Effects," Working Papers 404, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    10. Stéphane Mechoulan, 2007. "Market structure and communicable diseases," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(2), pages 468-492, May.
    11. M. Filippini & G. Masiero, 2012. "An empirical analysis of habit and addiction to antibiotics," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 471-486, April.
    12. Amit Batabyal & Peter Nijkamp, 2005. "Alternate Strategies for Managing Resistance to Antibiotics and Pesticides," ERSA conference papers ersa05p161, European Regional Science Association.
    13. Joëlle Noailly, 2008. "Coevolution of economic and ecological systems," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 1-29, February.
    14. John B. Horowitz & H. Brian Moehring, 2004. "How property rights and patents affect antibiotic resistance," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(6), pages 575-583.
    15. Joanna Coast & Richard Smith & Anne-Marie Karcher & Paula Wilton & Michael Millar, 2002. "Superbugs II: how should economic evaluation be conducted for interventions which aim to contain antimicrobial resistance?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(7), pages 637-647.
    16. Just, Richard E. & Netanyahu, Sinaia & Olson, Lars J., 2005. "Depletion of natural resources, technological uncertainty, and the adoption of technological substitutes," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 91-108, June.
    17. Gerard Gaudet & Michel Moreaux & Stephen W. Salant, 2001. "Intertemporal Depletion of Resource Sites by Spatially Distributed Users," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 1149-1159, September.

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