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Law as a Public Good: The Economics of Anarchy

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  • Cowen, Tyler
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    File URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0266267100003060
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Economics and Philosophy.

    Volume (Year): 8 (1992)
    Issue (Month): 02 (October)
    Pages: 249-267

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    Handle: RePEc:cup:ecnphi:v:8:y:1992:i:02:p:249-267_00

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    Cited by:
    1. Powell, Benjamin & Stringham, Edward P., 2008. "Public Choice and the Economic Analysis of Anarchy: A Survey," Working Papers 2008-7, Suffolk University, Department of Economics.
    2. François Facchini & Mickaël Melki, 2011. "Optimal Government Size and Economic Growth in France (1871-2008): An explanation by the State and Market Failures," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 11077, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    3. Caplan, Bryan & Stringham, Edward, 2003. "Networks, law, and the paradox of cooperation," MPRA Paper 26086, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Adam C. Smith & David B. Skarbek & Bart J. Wilson, 2009. "Anarchy, Groups, and Conflict: An Experiment on the Emergence of Protective Associations," Working Papers 09-03, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    5. Edward Stringham, 2002. "The Emergence of the London Stock Exchange as a Self-Policing Club," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 17(Spring 20), pages 1-19.
    6. Shruti Rajagopalan & Virgil Storr, 2012. "The rationality of taking to the hills," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 53-62, March.
    7. Alberto Zazzaro, 2011. "The Costs of Inter-Firm Networks," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 4, December.
    8. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00654363 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Powell, Benjamin & Wilson, Bart J., 2008. "An experimental investigation of Hobbesian jungles," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 66(3-4), pages 669-686, June.
    10. Rogers, Douglas B. & Smith, Adam C. & Wilson, Bart J., 2013. "Violence, access, and competition in the market for protection," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-17.
    11. Edward Stringham & Todd Zywicki, 2011. "Rivalry and superior dispatch: an analysis of competing courts in medieval and early modern England," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(3), pages 497-524, June.

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