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Administrative Dimensions of Tax Reform

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  • Richard M. Bird

    (Business Economics, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto
    International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University
    Australian Taxation Studies Program (ATAX), Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales)

Abstract

The best tax policy in the world is worth little if it cannot be implemented effectively. Tax policy design in developing countries must therefore take the administrative dimension of taxation carefully into account. What can be done may to a considerable extent determine what is done in any country. This paper discusses the relationship between tax policy and tax administration. When can policy lead administration? When must policy initiatives wait on administrative reform? How exactly can both sides of the policy and administrative agenda be advanced together? The paper sets out the broad outlines of administrative reform -- the essential conditions for such reform, its principal components, and its limits as a way of solving critical tax problems and provides a short case study of the interaction of tax policy and tax administration in the Polish Tax reform of the early 1990s.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Society for AEF in its journal Annals of Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 15 (2014)
Issue (Month): 2 (November)
Pages: 963-992

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Handle: RePEc:cuf:journl:y:2014:v:15:i:2:bird

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  1. Odd-Helge Fjeldstad, 2002. "Fighting fiscal corruption: The case of the Tanzania Revenue Authority," CMI Working Papers WP 2002:3, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
  2. Frank A. Cowell, 1990. "Cheating the Government: The Economics of Evasion," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262532484, December.
  3. Richard M. Bird & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Benno Torgler, 2004. "Societal Institutions and Tax Effort in Developing Countries," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0406, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  4. Slemrod, Joel & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 2002. "Tax avoidance, evasion, and administration," Handbook of Public Economics, in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 22, pages 1423-1470 Elsevier.
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