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Cyclical and Seasonal Properties of Canadian Gross Flows of Labour

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  • Stephen R. G. Jones

Abstract

Although net monthly changes in unemployment and employment are relatively small, the level of gross flows among the three conventional labor force states, Employment, Unemployment, and Not-in-the-Labor-Force, tends to be very large. This paper reviews Canadian evidence on monthly gross flows of labor for the period since 1976. It analyzes both seasonal and cyclical components of these flows and presents comparison with international evidence. It also discusses how these results bear on a number of important policy questions.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Toronto Press in its journal Canadian Public Policy.

Volume (Year): 19 (1993)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 1-17

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Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:19:y:1993:i:1:p:1-17

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Cited by:
  1. Andreas Hornstein & Mingwei Yuan, 1999. "Can a Matching Model Explain the Long-Run Increase in Canada's Unemployment Rate?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(4), pages 878-905, August.
  2. Dave Andolfatto & Scott Hendry & Kevin Moran, 2004. "Labour markets, liquidity, and monetary policy regimes," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(2), pages 392-420, May.
  3. Brian Silverstone & Will Bell, 2011. "Gross Labour Market Flows in New Zealand: Some Questions and Answers," Working Papers in Economics, University of Waikato, Department of Economics 11/15, University of Waikato, Department of Economics.
  4. Walsh, Patrick Paul, 2003. "The cyclical pattern of regional unemployment flows in Poland," Economic Systems, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 155-169, June.
  5. Louis N. Christofides & C. J. McKenna, 1993. "Employment Flows and Job Tenure in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, University of Toronto Press, vol. 19(2), pages 145-161, June.
  6. Brian Silverstone, 2001. "Some Aspects of Labour Market Flows in New Zealand 1986-2001," Working Papers in Economics, University of Waikato, Department of Economics 01/02, University of Waikato, Department of Economics.

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