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Absenteeism Predictors: Least Squares, Rank Regression, and Model Selection Results

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  • Mohammed Chaudhury
  • Ignace Ng
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    Abstract

    This paper examines the determinants of absenteeism using ordinary least squares rank-based regressions and a model selection procedure. The results show that personal attributes are the most important determinants of long-term absences. For total working days lost, the penalty factors are the most significant predictors. The results also show that absenteeism tends to be lower among firms with more part-time workers. Unionization, on the other hand, increases the total days lost due to absenteeism.

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    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0008-4085%28199208%2925%3A3%3C615%3AAPLSRR%3E2.0.CO%3B2-F
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 25 (1992)
    Issue (Month): 3 (August)
    Pages: 615-35

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    Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:25:y:1992:i:3:p:615-35

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    Cited by:
    1. Laszlo Goerke & Markus Pannenberg, 2012. "Trade Union Membership and Sickness Absence: Evidence from a Sick Pay Reform," CESifo Working Paper Series 3909, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Andrén, Daniela & Granlund, David, 2010. ""Waiting for the Other Shoe to Drop": Waiting for Health Care and Duration of Sick Leave," Working Papers 2010:8, Örebro University, School of Business.
    3. Andrén, Daniela, 2004. "Why Are The Sickness Absences So Long In Sweden," Working Papers in Economics 137, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    4. repec:ese:iserwp:2008-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Konstantinos, Pouliakas & Ioannis, Theodossiou, 2010. "An Inquiry Into the Theory, Causes and Consequences of Monitoring Indicators of Health and Safety At Work," MPRA Paper 20336, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Gilleskie, Donna, 2010. "Work absences and doctor visits during an illness episode: The differential role of preferences, production, and policies among men and women," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 156(1), pages 148-163, May.
    7. Solveig Osborg Ose & Jan Morten Dyrstad, 2001. "Non-linear Unemployment Effects in Sickness Absence: Discipline or Composition Effects?," Working Paper Series 2502, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    8. García-Serrano, Carlos & Malo, Miguel A., 2009. "The impact of union direct voice on voluntary and involuntary absenteeism," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 372-383, March.
    9. Sarah Brown & Robert McNabb & Karl Taylor, 2006. "Firm Performance, Worker Commitment and Loyalty," Working Papers 2006005, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2006.
    10. Drakopoulos, Stavros A. & Grimani, Aikaterini, 2011. "The relationship between absence from work and job satisfaction: Greece and UK comparisons," MPRA Paper 30990, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. De Paola, Maria, 2008. "Absenteeism and Peer Interaction Effects: Evidence from an Italian Public Institute," MPRA Paper 11425, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe & Wei, Xiangdong, 2008. "Teamwork, monitoring and absence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(3-4), pages 676-690, December.
    13. Moral De Blas, Alfonso & Corrales-Herrero, Helena & Martín-Román, Ángel, 2012. "Glass Ceiling or Slippery Floors? Understanding Gender Differences in the Spanish Worker’s Compensation System/¿Techo de cristal o suelo resbaladizo? Comprendiendo las diferencias de género en el ," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 311-340, Abril.
    14. Harald Pfeifer, 2014. "Absenteeism in Apprenticeships: What Role Do Works Councils Play?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0098, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
    15. Leontaridi, Rannia & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 2002. "Work-Related Stress, Quitting Intentions and Absenteeism," IZA Discussion Papers 493, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Leigh, J. Paul, 1995. "Smoking, self-selection and absenteeism," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 365-386.

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