Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The Art of Teaching Economics

Contents:

Author Info

  • David Colander

    ()
    (Middlebury College)

Abstract

This paper considers the teaching of economics and argues that content, not form is what is central to economics teaching. It considers the "new paradigm of teaching" and suggests that while there is much good in that new paradigm, it is dominated by a "common sense approach" to teaching that combines content and delivery issues, and is midway between the old paradigm of teaching and the new paradigm.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/i3/colander.htm
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Economics Network, University of Bristol in its journal International Review of Economics Education.

Volume (Year): 3 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 63-76

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:3:y:2004:i:1:p:63-76

Contact details of provider:
Postal: University of Bristol, BS8 1HH, United Kingdom
Fax: +44(0)117 331 4396
Web page: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. David Colander, 2003. "Muddling Through and Policy Analysis," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0317, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Simpson, Nicole & de Araujo, Pedro & O'Sullivan, Roisin, 2012. "What should be taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?," Working Papers 2012-01, Department of Economics, Colgate University.
  2. Mohammad Alauddin & Adrian Ashman, 2014. "The changing academic environment and diversity in students study philosophy, beliefs and attitudes in higher education," Discussion Papers Series 511, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  3. David Colander, 2004. "What We Teach and What We Do," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0426, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  4. Dr. Mohammad Alauddin & Professor John Foster, 2005. "Teaching Economics at the University Level: Dynamics of Parameters and Implications," Discussion Papers Series 339, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  5. Dr. Mohammad Alauddin & Professor John Foster, 2005. "Heterogenous clientele and product differentiation: teaching economics in a changing environment," Discussion Papers Series 340, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  6. Mohammad Alauddin & Temesgen Kifle, 2014. "Does the student evaluation of teaching instrument really measure instructors teaching effectiveness? An econometric analysis of students perceptions in economics courses," Discussion Papers Series 516, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  7. David Wilson & William Dixon, 2009. "Performing Economics: A Critique of 'Teaching and Learning'," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 91-105.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:3:y:2004:i:1:p:63-76. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Martin Poulter).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.