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Time Allocations and Reward Structures for US Academic Economists from 1955–2005: Evidence from Three National Surveys

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Author Info

  • Cynthia L. Harter

    ()
    (Eastern Kentucky University)

  • William E. Becker

    ()
    (Indiana University)

  • Michael Watts

    ()
    (Purdue University)

Abstract

Using survey data collected in 1995, 2000 and 2005 from US academic economists, in which respondents were asked to indicate what percentage of their work time they allocate to research, teaching and service activities, and also how their departments and schools weight research, teaching and service in determining annual raises and making promotion and tenure decisions, we find these economists were allocating more time to teaching even though perceived departmental and school incentives provided a clear premium for research. The overall samples did not show major changes in their allocation of time from 1995–2005, but there were different responses at different types of schools, with increased time spent on research by faculty at doctoral schools while at masters' and baccalaureate schools more time was devoted to teaching. We use regression analysis to investigate factors that affect how different faculty members allocate their time between teaching and research. In addition to Carnegie school classifications and related school characteristics, faculty members' gender and rank were significant predictors of how economists allocate their time. Male economists, particularly among assistant professors at research universities, spent less time on teaching and more time on research than female economists.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Economics Network, University of Bristol in its journal International Review of Economics Education.

Volume (Year): 10 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 6-27

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Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:10:y:2011:i:2:p:6-27

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  1. David N. Laband & Robert D. Tollison, 2003. "Dry Holes in Economic Research," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(2), pages 161-173, 05.
  2. Gautier, Axel & Wauthy, Xavier, 2007. "Teaching versus research: A multi-tasking approach to multi-department universities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 273-295, February.
  3. William E. Becker & Michael Watts, 2001. "Teaching Economics at the Start of the 21st Century: Still Chalk-and-Talk," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 446-451, May.
  4. Link, Albert N. & Swann, Christopher A. & Bozeman, Barry, 2008. "A time allocation study of university faculty," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 363-374, August.
  5. Becker, William E & Watts, Michael, 1996. "Chalk and Talk: A National Survey on Teaching Undergraduate Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 448-53, May.
  6. William E. Becker & Michael Watts, 2001. "Teaching Methods in U.S. Undergraduate Economics Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 269-279, January.
  7. Guest, Ross & Duhs, Alan, 2002. "Economics Teaching in Australian Universities: Rewards and Outcomes," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(241), pages 147-60, June.
  8. Becker, William E, Jr, 1979. "Professorial Behavior Given a Stochastic Reward Structure," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(5), pages 1010-17, December.
  9. Cynthia L. Harter & William E. Becker & Michael Watts, 2004. "Changing Incentives and Time Allocations for Academic Economists: Results from 1995 and 2000 National Surveys," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 89-97, January.
  10. William E. Becker & Michael Watts, 2001. "Teaching Methods in U.S. Undergraduate Economics Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 269-279, January.
  11. Cynthia L. Harter & William E. Becker & Michael Watts, 2004. "Changing Incentives and Time Allocations for Academic Economists: Results from 1995 and 2000 National Surveys," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 89-97, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Barham, Bradford L. & Foltz, Jeremy D. & Prager, Daniel L., 2014. "Making time for science," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 21-31.

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