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Structural Change and Technology. A Long View

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  • Bart Verspagen

Abstract

Neo-Schumpeterians of the 1970s and 1980s argued for the concept of pervasive technological systems as one way of interpreting creative destruction. Pervasive technologies are basic innovations that find application in a wide variety of sectors in the economy. It has recently been suggested that the period of rapid economic growth in the 1990s in the United States can be explained by the rise of a set of technologies known as Information and Communication Technologies (ict). Such an interpretation is certainly in broad accordance with the notions of Schumpeterian radical technological breakthroughs, creative destruction and pervasive technological systems. This paper provides an attempt to interpret this ict ¿revolution¿ from a Schumpeterian point of view, using input-output data and technology flow matrices for the us economy. The paper concludes with a broad discussion of the historic role of ict in the us and world economy.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Presses de Sciences-Po in its journal Revue économique.

Volume (Year): 55 (2004)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 1099-1125

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Handle: RePEc:cai:recosp:reco_556_1099

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  1. Jaffe, A.B. & Trajtenberg, M., 1992. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," Papers 14-92, Tel Aviv.
  2. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
  3. Zvi Griliches, 1979. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 92-116, Spring.
  4. Nelson, Richard R & Wright, Gavin, 1992. "The Rise and Fall of American Technological Leadership: The Postwar Era in Historical Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 1931-64, December.
  5. Leontief, Wassily & Duchin, Faye, 1986. "The Future Impact of Automation on Workers," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195036237.
  6. Kleinknecht, Alfred, 1990. "Are There Schumpeterian Waves of Innovations?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 81-92, March.
  7. Keith Smith, . "Assessing the economic impacts of ICT," STEP Report series 200201, The STEP Group, Studies in technology, innovation and economic policy.
  8. David, Paul A, 1990. "The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 355-61, May.
  9. Chris Freeman & Luc Soete, 1997. "The Economics of Industrial Innovation, 3rd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 3, volume 1, number 0262061953, January.
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Cited by:
  1. André Lorentz & Maria Savona, 2007. "Evolutionary Micro-dynamics and Changes in the Economic Structure," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2007-17, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Evolutionary Economics Group.
  2. Carolina Castaldi & Alessandro Nuvolari, 2004. "Technological Revolutions and Economic Growth: The “Age of Steam” Reconsidered," LEM Papers Series 2004/11, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  3. Maria Savona & André Lorentz, 2005. "Demand and Technology Determinants of Structural Change and Tertiarisation: An Input-Output Structural Decomposition Analysis for four OECD Countries," LEM Papers Series 2005/25, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  4. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2006. "Innovation, diffusion and catching up in the fifth long wave," MPRA Paper 27521, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Lim, A., 2003. "Inter-firm Alliances during Pre-standardization in ICT," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 03.03, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS).
  6. Lim, A., 2002. "Standards Setting Processes in ICT: The Negotiations Approach," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 02.19, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS).
  7. Keizer, J.A. & Vos, J.P., 2003. "Diagnosing risks in new product development," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 03.11, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS).
  8. Pier Paolo Saviotti & Andreas Pyka, 2002. "Economic Development, Qualitative Change And Employment Creation," Computing in Economics and Finance 2002 362, Society for Computational Economics.
  9. Castaldi, C. & Nuvolari, A., 2003. "Technological Revolutions and Economic Growth:The �Age of Steam� Reconsidered," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 03.25, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS).

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