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Family Policies in Industrialized Countries: Is There Convergence?

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  • Anne H. Gauthier
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    Abstract

    This article examines the trends in family policies in 22 industrialized countries since 1970. Based on time-series of indicators of cash benefits and support for working parents, it examines the hypothesis of convergence in national family policies. Results suggest that although all countries have increased their support for families since 1970, and all countries have adapted their policies to reflect the new demographic and economic realities of families, there has been no cross-national convergence. Results even suggest a divergence as captured by the growing cross-national dispersion of the family policy indicators. Results are thus in line with other studies of welfare states which have concluded that cross-national differences persist in spite of global macro-level factors.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED) in its journal Population (english edition).

    Volume (Year): 57 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 447-474

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    Handle: RePEc:cai:poeine:pope_203_0447

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    Cited by:
    1. Ronald Rindfuss & David Guilkey & S. Morgan & Øystein Kravdal & Karen Guzzo, 2007. "Child care availability and first-birth timing in Norway," Demography, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 345-372, May.
    2. Obinger, Herbert & Starke, Peter, 2014. "Welfare state transformation: Convergence and the rise of the supply side model," TranState Working Papers 180, University of Bremen, Collaborative Research Center 597: Transformations of the State.
    3. Karl Aiginger & Kurt Kratena & Margit Schratzenstaller & Teresa Weiss, 2014. "Moving towards a new growth model," WWWforEurope Deliverables series 3, WWWforEurope.
    4. Olivier Thévenon, 2008. "Family policies in Europe: available databases and initial comparisons," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 6(1), pages 165-177.
    5. Dimova, Ralitza & Wolff, François-Charles, 2006. "Do Downward Private Transfers Enhance Maternal Labor Supply? Evidence from around Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 2469, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Henriette Engelhardt, 2009. "Fertility Intentions and Preferences: Effects of Structural and Financial Incentives and Constraints in Austria," Working Papers 0402, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.
    7. Suzanne Bianchi & Laurent Lesnard & Tiziana Nazio & Sara Raley, 2014. "Gender and time allocation of cohabiting and married women and men in France, Italy, and the United States," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(8), pages 183-216, July.
    8. Gerda R. Neyer, 2003. "Family policies and low fertility in Western Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    9. Johannes Geyer & Viktor Steiner, 2007. "Short-Run and Long-Term Effects of Childbirth on Mothers' Employment and Working Hours across Institutional Regimes: An Empirical Analysis Based on the European Community Household Panel," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 682, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    10. Gerda R. Neyer, 2006. "Family policies and fertility in Europe: fertility policies at the intersection of gender policies, employment policies and care policies," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    11. Frątczak, Ewa, 2004. "Family and Fertility in Poland: Changes during the Transition Period," Discussion Paper 206, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    12. Janneke Plantenga, 2014. "Searching for welfare, work and gender equality," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 59, WWWforEurope.
    13. Vladimir M. Shkolnikov & Evgueni M. Andreev & René Houle & James W. Vaupel, 2004. "To concentration of reproduction in cohorts of US and European women," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-027, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    14. Massimiliano Bratti & Konstantinos Tatsiramos, 2012. "The effect of delaying motherhood on the second childbirth in Europe," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 291-321, January.

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