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The impact of temporary migration on human capital accumulation and economie development

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  • Manon Domingues Dos Santos
  • Fabien Postel-Vinay

Abstract

We study the long-run growth impact on the emigrants' country of origin of a change in immigration policy implemented by the host country. The policy change takes the form of an increase in the ratio of temporary to permanent visas issued. This policy change has two counteracting effects on the source country: first, it discourages human capital accumulation (which is harmful for development), and second, it facilitates the diffusion of knowledge (which encourages growth). We are able to analyze the determinants of an “optimal” (i.e. growth-maximizing) share of temporary visas.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its journal Brussels economic review.

Volume (Year): 47 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 77-88

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Handle: RePEc:bxr:bxrceb:y:2004:v:47:i:1:p:77-88

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Related research

Keywords: skilled migration; immigration policy; human capital; growth;

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Cited by:
  1. François-Charles Wolff & Manon Domingues Dos Santos, 2010. "Pourquoi les immigrés portugais veulent-ils tant retourner au pays ?," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 195(4), pages 1-14.
  2. Frederic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2007. "Skilled migration: the perspective of developing countries," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0710, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Michel, BEINE & Cecily, DEFOORT & Frédéric, DOCQUIER, 2007. "A Panel Data Analysis of the Brain Gain," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2007024, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
  4. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Globalization, Brain Drain and Development," Working Papers 2011-18, Department of Economics, Bar-Ilan University.
  5. Anda David & Christophe Nordman, 2014. "Skill Mismatch and Migration in Egypt and Tunisia," Working Papers DT/2014/05, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
  6. Docquier, Frédéric, 2006. "Brain Drain and Inequality Across Nations," IZA Discussion Papers 2440, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz, 2011. "Migration and Education," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2011011, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  8. Elisabetta Lodigiani, 2009. "Diaspora Externalities as a Cornerstone of the New Brain Drain Literature," Development Working Papers 277, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.

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