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The Return to English in a Non-English Speaking Country: Russian Immigrants and Native Israelis in Israel

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Author Info

  • Lang Kevin

    ()
    (Boston University, NBER and IZA)

  • Siniver Erez

    ()
    (College of Management - Academic Studies)

Abstract

Using a unique sample of Russian immigrants and native Israelis, we examine the return to English knowledge. Panel and cross-section estimates of the return to English are substantial for highly educated immigrants and natives. Hebrew and English language acquisition contribute to immigrant/native earnings convergence, but most convergence is explained by other factors. While immigrants with low levels of education do not benefit from knowing English, native Israelis may. Conditional on occupation, English and Hebrew acquisition are largely orthogonal. Therefore earlier work on the importance of knowledge of the host-country language (Hebrew) is not significantly biased by unmeasured English knowledge.

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File URL: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejeap.2009.9.1/bejeap.2009.9.1.2274/bejeap.2009.9.1.2274.xml?format=INT
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy.

Volume (Year): 9 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (November)
Pages: 1-30

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:9:y:2009:i:1:n:50

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Antonio Di Paolo & Josep Lluís Raymond, 2010. "Language knowledge and earnings in Catalonia," Working Papers wpdea1001, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
  2. Chr. Hjorth-Andersen, 2006. "The Relative Importance of the European Languages," Discussion Papers 06-23, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  3. Antonio Di Paolo, 2010. "Knowledge of Catalan, public/private sector choice and earnings: Evidence from a double sample selection model," Working Papers XREAP2010-09, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Sep 2010.

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