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Training and Turnover with Equilibrium Unemployment

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  • Carter Thomas J.

    ()
    (University of South Florida, St. Petersburg)

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    Abstract

    Government policies that promote on-the-job training have different effects when, due to unemployment, workers value job security. In this case, an increase in specific training leads to greater job security and lower wages. The wage result, although perhaps counterintuitive, is supported by, and helps explain, published empirical work. Even with lower wages, training policies may be Pareto-improving or may lower welfare, depending on the elasticity of demand for labor. Training mandates and subsidies to training, because of their differing impacts on job security, have different unemployment and welfare effects; mandates are preferred. If government policy can influence specific training and job security independently, training is never optimally encouraged. Policies that promote general training and policies that promote specific training can both raise employment, but in different ways. Specific training lowers the employment outflow; general training raises the employment inflow.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy.

    Volume (Year): 11 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 1-23

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    Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:11:y:2011:i:1:n:16

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    1. Lalith Munasinghe & Brendan O'Flaherty, 2005. "Specific Training Sometimes Cuts Wages and Always Cuts Turnover," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(2), pages 213-234, April.
    2. Parent, Daniel, 1999. "Wages and Mobility: The Impact of Employer-Provided Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 298-317, April.
    3. Malul Miki & Luski Israel, 2009. "The Optimal Policy Combination of the Minimum Wage and the Earned Income Tax Credit," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-24, November.
    4. Malul, Miki, 2009. "Older workers' employment in dynamic technology changes," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 809-813, October.
    5. Hiroaki Miyamoto & Yoshimasa Shirai, 2006. "Job Flows And Unemployment In An Equilibrium Unemployment Model With Firm-Specific Skill Training," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 57(4), pages 547-561.
    6. Carter, Thomas J. & De Lancey, Paul R., 1997. "Just, Unjust, and Just-Cause Dismissals," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 619-628, July.
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