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China's changing growth pattern

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Author Info

  • Dew, Ed

    ()
    (Bank of England)

  • Martin, Jeremy

    ()
    (Bank of England)

  • Giese, Julia

    ()
    (Bank of England)

  • Zinna, Gabriele

    ()
    (Bank of England)

Abstract

China’s growth over the past 30 years has been remarkable. In part, that reflects a strategy pursued by many emerging market economies in the past with a focus on expanding exports. More recently, China’s current account surplus has shrunk, reflecting the collapse in world trade during the financial crisis, and the domestic stimulus China introduced in response. This article discusses China’s previous growth pattern and asks whether the nascent rebalancing will be sustained, considering implications for the rest of the world.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Bank of England in its journal Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 51 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 49-56

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Handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0044

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  1. Hui Tong & Shang-Jin Wei & Tamim Bayoumi, 2010. "The Chinese Corporate Savings Puzzle," IMF Working Papers 10/275, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Astley, Mark & Giese, Julia & Hume, Michael & Kubelec, Chris, 2009. "Global imbalances and the financial crisis," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 49(3), pages 178-190.
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Cited by:
  1. Sun Xuegong, . "China: Searching for a New Development Modal," Chapters, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
  2. Hooley, John, 2013. "Bringing down the Great Wall? Global implications of capital account liberalisation in China," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(4), pages 304-315.

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