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Genetic Endowments, Parental And Child Health In Rural Ethiopia

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  • Bereket Kebede

Abstract

The determinants of long-term child health in Ethiopia - as measured by height-for-age "z"-scores - are examined controlling for community, household and individual level heterogeneity. The influence of parental health and the role of genetics are analysed. The height of parents is highly significant but no significant correlation with per capita expenditures is found. Food prices, birth order, sex and age of children, number of siblings of the mother, years of marriage and altitude are important determinants. Deprivations in later years are more important than during pre- or neo-natal periods. Genetic inheritance seems to explain the correlations between child and parental health. Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2005.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Scottish Economic Society in its journal Scottish Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 52 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 (05)
Pages: 194-221

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Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:2:p:194-221

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Cited by:
  1. Gregory Ponthiere, 2011. "Mortality, Family and Lifestyles," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 175-190, June.
  2. Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Rawlings, Samantha, 2009. "Gradients of the Intergenerational Transmission of Health in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 4353, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Felfe, Christina & Deuchert. Eva, 2011. "The tempest: Using a natural disaster to evaluate the link between wealth and child development," Economics Working Paper Series 1146, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  4. Grégory Ponthière, 2010. "Mortality, family and lifestyles," Working Papers halshs-00564898, HAL.
  5. Coneus, Katja & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2012. "The intergenerational transmission of health in early childhood—Evidence from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 89-97.
  6. Katja Coneus & C. Katharina Spieß, 2008. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Health in Early Childhood," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 126, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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