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Socio-Economic Status and Child Health: Does Public Health Insurance Narrow the Gap?

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  • Currie, Janet

Abstract

Drawing on evidence from the United States, this paper examines the effects of public health insurance on children. Recent expansions of American public health insurance programs to previously ineligible children have created a great deal of variation that can be used to identify their effects. Results indicate that providing public insurance to poor children narrows socioeconomic gaps in utilization and health among children. However, inefficiencies and inequalities in the allocation of health care remain, which suggests that universality and outreach programs are also important components of the public health systems common in Europe. Copyright 1995 by The editors of the Scandinavian Journal of Economics.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Scandinavian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 97 (1995)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 603-20

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Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:97:y:1995:i:4:p:603-20

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Web page: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-9442

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Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0347-0520

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Cited by:
  1. Layte, Richard & Nolan, Anne, 2013. "Socioeconomic Inequalities in Child Health in Ireland," Papers WP453, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  2. Layte, Richard & Nolan, Anne, 2013. "Income-Related Inequity in the Use of GP Services: A Comparison of Ireland and Scotland," Papers WP454, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  3. Reis, Mauricio, 2012. "Differences in nutritional outcomes between Brazilian white and black children," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 174-188.
  4. Lori Curtis & Martin D. Dooley & Ellen L. Lipman & David H. Feeny, . "The Role of Permanent Income and Family Structure in the Determination of Child Health in the Ontario Child Health Study," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 16, McMaster University.
  5. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile, 2002. "Socioeconomic Status and Health: Why is the Relationship Stronger for Older Children?," NBER Working Papers 9098, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile, 2003. "Socioeconomic Status and Child Health: Why Is the Relationship Stronger for Older Children?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1813-1823, December.

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