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An Investigation Into The Impact Of Tutorials On The Performance Of Economics Students

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  • Pm Horn
  • Ai Jansen
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    Abstract

    The deteriorating performance of first-year economics students has become a concern at many South African universities. Addressing the issue requires an understanding of the factors influencing students' success. Studies analysing academic performance use the education production function approach. This approach identifies inputs that are crucial to learning and to achieving certain outputs. Factors that have been investigated in other studies include the impact of lecture attendance on performance, school-leaving exam (matriculation) results, particularly performance in mathematics, and the gender and age of students. Copyright (c) 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2009 Economic Society of South Africa.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Economic Society of South Africa in its journal South African Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 77 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 1 (03)
    Pages: 179-189

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:77:y:2009:i:1:p:179-189

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    References

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    1. Kudayja Parker, 2006. "The Effect Of Student Characteristics On Achievement In Introductory Microeconomics In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 74(1), pages 137-149, 03.
    2. Siegfried, John J & Fels, Rendigs, 1979. "Research on Teaching College Economics: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 923-69, September.
    3. Luca Stanca, 2006. "The Effects of Attendance on Academic Performance: Panel Data Evidence for Introductory Microeconomics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 251-266, July.
    4. Benjamin Greene, 1997. "Verbal Abilities, Gender, and the Introductory Economics Course: A New Look at an Old Assumption," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(1), pages 13-30, January.
    5. L Edwards, 2000. "An Econometric Evaluation of Academic Development Programmes in Economics," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 68(3), pages 204-215, 09.
    6. Cornéa Walbeek, 2004. "Does Lecture Attendance Matter? Some Observations From A First-Year Economics Course At The University Of Cape Town," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 72(4), pages 861-883, 09.
    7. Gregory A. Krohn & Catherine M. O'Connor, 2005. "Student Effort and Performance over the Semester," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 3-28, January.
    8. Tiffany Hutcheson & Harry Tse, 2006. "Tutorial Attendance and Grade Achievement," Working Paper Series 145, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    9. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
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    Cited by:
    1. Astrid Schmulian & Stephen Coetzee, 2011. "Class absenteeism: reasons for non-attendance and the effect on academic performance," Accounting Research Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 24(2), pages 178-194, September.

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