Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Cohabitation and the Measurement of Child Poverty

Contents:

Author Info

  • Carlson, Marcia
  • Danziger, Sheldon
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The authors use 1990 U.S. Census of Population data to calculate what poverty rates would have been if cohabitors were treated in the same manner as married couples. They find that the official treatment of cohabiting partners as separate family units overstated the extent of poverty in 1989 among all children by about 3 percent. Only about 11 percent of the observed rise in child poverty between 1969 and 1989 would be eliminated if the Census Bureau made this change in its definition of the family. The authors estimate a logistic regression model of the likelihood that poor, cohabiting families with children would be reclassified as non-poor if the cohabitor's income were included in family income. They find that many of these families would remain poor despite this change in measurement procedure because many cohabitors have low annual earnings or no earnings at all. Copyright 1999 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by International Association for Research in Income and Wealth in its journal Review of Income & Wealth.

    Volume (Year): 45 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 179-91

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:45:y:1999:i:2:p:179-91

    Contact details of provider:
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0034-6586
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0034-6586

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Sheela Kennedy & Catherine Fitch, 2012. "Measuring Cohabitation and Family Structure in the United States: Assessing the Impact of New Data From the Current Population Survey," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1479-1498, November.
    2. Lindquist, Matthew J. & Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella, 2008. "The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Sweden," Working Paper Series 4/2008, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    3. Miguel Székely & Marianne Hilgert, 2000. "What Drives Differences in Inequality Across Countries?," Research Department Publications 4243, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    4. Mary C. Daly & Robert G. Valletta, 2000. "Inequality and poverty in the United States: the effects of changing family behavior and rising wage dispersion," Working Paper Series 2000-06, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    5. Miguel Székely & Marianne Hilgert, 2000. "¿Qué hay detrás de las diferencias en la desigualdad entre los países?," Research Department Publications 4244, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    6. Reagan Baughman & Stacy Dickert-Conlin & Scott Houser, 2000. "How Well Can We Track Cohabitation Using the SIPP? A Consideration of Direct and Inferred Measures," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 30, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:45:y:1999:i:2:p:179-91. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.